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Aug 12
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): The Latest

Visit the BPHC Main Page on COVID-19 

OVERVIEW:

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 or COVID-19 (formerly referred to as 2019 Novel Coronavirus or 2019-nCoV) is a new respiratory virus that was first identified in Wuhan, China in December of 2019. The City of Boston and BPHC have extended the public health emergency declaration until further notice

Boston's Latest Numbers (As of August 12, 2020):
(Updated Monday-Friday)

  • 14,657 confirmed cases 

  • 10,716 recovered

  • 743 deaths

Click here for the BPHC 08-06-2020 Weekly COVID-19 Report

Boston Race/Ethnicity Case Data: 

(Updated Monday-Friday)

Race/Ethnicity

Known Cases

Percentage of Known Cases

Asian/PI

470

4%

Black/African-American

4,577

36%

Latinx/Hispanic

3,589

28%

Other

847

7%

White

3,158

25%

Total Race/Ethnicity Identified Cases in Boston

12,641

86.2% of total cases in Boston have known Race/Ethnicity data

Total Cases in Boston 

14,657

 


Boston Race/Ethnicity Death Data: 

(Updated Monday-Friday)

Race/Ethnicity

Deaths

Percentage of Known Deaths

Asian/PI

47

6%

Black/African-American

249

35%

Latinx/Hispanic

81

11%

Other

24

3%

White

318

44%

Total Race/Ethnicity Identified Deaths in Boston

719

96.8% of total deaths in Boston have known Race/Ethnicity data

Total Deaths in Boston

743

 


Although complete data on race and ethnicity among COVID-19 positive cases in Boston residents has not been reported to the City of Boston, the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) is actively working to collect available data for public release.

NOTE: Information on race and ethnicity data is collected and reported by multiple entities and may or may not reflect self-reporting by the individual case. A classification of "missing" indicates that no reporter knew the race and ethnicity of the individual, the individual refused to provide the information, or that the originating reporting system does not capture the information. "Other" indicates multiple races or another race that is not listed above.

Number of deaths at long-term care facilities: 347 (Updated weekly: 08/10/2020)


Weekly Neighborhood Data: 

As of Monday, August 3, 2020, there were 126,560 COVID-19 tests (with results) of Boston residents. Of 126,560 total tests of Boston residents, 11.7% have tested positive, which is down from 12.4% reported through Monday, July 27. For all Boston residents, the percent positive for tests increased from 2.1% for the prior week (July 21-27) to 2.8% for the current week (July 28 to August 3).

NEIGHBORHOOD

​NUMBER TESTED

OF TESTED, CUMULATIVE % POSITIVE​

CURRENT WEEK % POSITIVE

TESTING RATE PER 10,000 RESIDENTS​

East Boston - 02128

9,315

19.9%

8.8%​

1,985.0

Mattapan - 02126

​ 4,863 

​17.2%

2.6%

1,643.4

Hyde Park - 02136​

​7,133

16.4%

3.3%

​2,084.4

Dorchester - 02122, 02124

14,231

​15.9%

4.1%​

1,759.5

Dorchester - 02121, 02125

12,363

​15.5%

5.4%

​1,923.4

Roslindale - 02131

​ 6,319

12.6%

3.9%

1,871.1

Roxbury - 02119, 02120

9,909

10.9%

2.9%​

​2,297.6

West Roxbury - 02132

4,616

10.5%

2.1%​

1,620.4

South End - 02111, 02118

9,560

10.1%

1.8%

2,673.7

Allston/Brighton - 02163, 02134, 02135

​ 11,632

8.3%

1.1%​

​1,746.9

South Boston - 02127, 02210

7,049

7.9%

2.1%

1,758.1

Jamaica Plain - 02130

 10,478

7.4%​

2.0%

2,595.0

C​harlestown - 02129

3,230

6.7%​

2.1%

​1,663.7

Fenway - 02115, 02215

5,581

6.0%​

1.6%

1,019.8

Back Bay, Beacon Hill, West End, Downtown, & North End - 02108, 02114, 02116, 02199, 02222, 02109, 02110, 02013​

10,243

5.4%​

​1.1%

1,838.2

Other

​ N/A

N/A​

N/A​

​N/A

Boston

126,560

11.7%

2.8%

1,862.8

*N/A = Unable to calculate due to small counts (N<5)


CLICK HERE FOR A MAP OF TESTING SITES IN BOSTON


Visit the City of Boston's Reopening Page
The state has updated guidance on the Reopening Massachusetts website. The City of Boston also continues to update City-specific guidance on the reopening website


If you are concerned that a business located in Boston is not following Massachusetts’ mandatory COVID re-opening protocols, please call or email the Mayor’s Health Line 617-534-5050 / mayorshealthline@bphc.org. All caller information will be kept confidential. If you have a concern regarding a Massachusetts workplace outside the City of Boston, you may contact the board of health for that municipality. For any violation within the Commonwealth, you may also contact the Department of Labor Standards (DLS) through their hotline: (508)-616-0461 ext. 9488, or by sending an email to safepublicworkplacemailbox@mass.gov


ABOUT OUR RESPONSE:

Since January, BPHC and Boston EMS have taken extensive steps to prepare for a potential outbreak of COVID-19.

BPHC is engaging in daily communications with the CDC, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), City of Boston departments and other community partners to make sure we have the latest information on guidance, best practices and recommendations. BPHC will provide updated information on this website and on our social media channels as it becomes available.

We are confident the City of Boston continues to be ready for a safe and effective response as the situation develops.

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT COVID-19?

Visit the BPHC Main COVID-19 Page

Call 311 or 211

Call the Mayor's Healthline: 

617-534-5050 or Toll-Free: 1-800-847-0710

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website on COVID-19

Massachusetts Department of Public Health website on COVID-19


Media Contact: 

Caitlin McLaughlin 

cmclaughlin@bphc.org 

(857-393-0002)

Aug 10
Mayor Walsh Urges Caution During Hot Temperatures

Sunday, August 9, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh is reminding residents to take precautions to stay cool during the hot and humid weather that is forecasted for today through Wednesday, August 12, 2020. For the next three days, the temperature will reach the high 80s and low 90s, with the heat index, or "real feel" temperature, reaching up to 96 degrees. 

"As we continue to take COVID-19 precautions, please take steps to keep yourself safe in the hot weather," said Mayor Walsh. "Whenever you're out, please wear a face covering, stay six feet away from others, avoid crowds and wash your hands often. If you begin to feel overheated, find a shaded place that's six feet away from others and remove your face covering."

Mayor Walsh has not declared a Heat Emergency. The City's two outdoor pools, the  BCYF Clougherty Pool  in Charlestown and the BCYF Mirabella Pool  in the North End, are now open seven days a week through Labor Day from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there are several new protocols in place at the outdoor pools. Capacity has been reduced to less than 40 percent capacity or 75 people per session and you must register for a swim time slot ahead of time as walk-ins will not be allowed. Registration opens 24 hours before the following day's sessions at Boston.gov/BCYF-Summer

Tot sprays are open at playgrounds in the City, with restrictions. Boston Public Libraries and indoor City-operated pools remain closed to the public at this time due to COVID-19 safety measures. 

Information on heat safety tips can be found online at boston.gov/heat and by following @CityofBoston on Twitter. Residents can sign up for Alert Boston, the City's emergency notification system, to receive emergency alerts by phone, email or text. Residents are also encouraged to call 311 with any questions about available city services.

The Mayor issued the following heat safety tips for all members of the public:

  • Children and pets should never be left alone in vehicles, even for short periods of time.

  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of fluids regardless of activity level. Avoid alcoholic beverages and liquids high in sugar or caffeine.

  • Adults and children should use sunscreen containing an SPF-30 or higher and wear protective, loose-fitting clothing, including long sleeve shirts and hats.

  • Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours. Rest often in shady areas and be extra cautious from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., when the sun's UV radiation is strongest.

  • Know the signs of heat exhaustion. Heavy sweating, cool and clammy skin, dizziness, nausea, and muscle aches could all be signs of heat exhaustion. If symptoms persist, call 911 immediately. Do not delay care. Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the US and can exacerbate underlying illnesses.

  • Keep cool with showers, shade, and air conditioning or fans. The City's two outdoor poolsUrban wilds and tot sprays at playgrounds are open in Boston. When visiting, residents should wear face coverings (unless in the spray), maintain 6 feet of distance, and wash hands before and after visiting.If it is cooler outside than at home, wear a face covering and find a shady spot outside. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering. If no AC is available:

    • Take frequent cool showers

    • Help find a non-sick family member or neighbor with AC to visit. Wear a face covering and stay 6 feet apart.

  • If you have a child in your home, use child window guards in addition to screens on any open window on the second story or above. Falls are the leading cause of injury for children under the age of six. 

  • Secure all window air conditioner units according to the manufacturer's specifications.

  • Please call or virtually check on neighbors, especially older adults, and people with disabilities.

Helping the Homeless:

  • If you see homeless individuals out in the heat who appear immobile or disoriented, please call 911. Please ask them if they need assistance.

  • The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) operates emergency shelters at 112 Southampton St. and 794 Massachusetts Ave. These facilities are air conditioned and open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

  • The City of Boston works closely with a network of shelter providers to ensure there is adequate shelter, food, water, and a cool respite from the heat.

  • Street outreach teams providing recovery services, including the Engagement Center behind 112 Southampton St., remain operating as normal during summertime weather. 

  • All sites (Shelters, the Engagement Center, comfort stations) are following COVID-19 guidelines by promoting handwashing, hand sanitizer, and face coverings. Guests are provided sunscreen and water. Nursing teams are onsite to support. 

Playground Safety:  

  • Children should always wear shoes on playgrounds because surfaces can become extremely hot and cause burns, even splash pads and spray decks.

  • Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, children should wear a face covering (except while in the water), stay 6 feet away from others, and wash/sanitize hands before and after play.

Beach Safety:

  • Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), if going to a beach or a large body of water, it is important to wear a face covering unless in the water, stay 6 feet apart from others, and avoid crowds due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. 

  • Don't wear face coverings in the water because they can be difficult to breathe through when they're wet. This means it is particularly important to maintain social distancing in the water. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering.

Outdoor Fires and Grilling:

  • No outdoor fires are allowed in Boston, including fire pits, chimineas, and bonfires.

  • Charcoal grills must be on the ground and away from buildings. Keep in mind the wind and never leave unattended. When done, dispose of the ash in a metal container once completely out.

  • Propane tank grills are only allowed on first floor porches with steps to the ground. Do not place propane tank grills near air conditioners or up against a building. Make sure all connections are tight and never carry propane tanks into a home.

  • Grills should always be used in a well-ventilated area

###

Aug 03
Mayor Walsh Announces Free Pop-Up COVID-19 Testing in South Boston

​Monday, August 3, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced that the City of Boston's pop-up COVID-19 testing site, in partnership with the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, will now be offering COVID-19 testing in South Boston. This COVID-19 testing initiative will be available starting tomorrow, Tuesday, August 4 to Saturday, August 15 at Moakley Park on Old Colony Avenue near 1187 Columbia Road in South Boston. Testing will be available at no cost for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals by walk-up only. No appointment needed but registration is required for individuals to receive test results. For a quicker testing experience, residents are encouraged to pre-register at (617) 568-4500.

"Testing is one of the best tools we have to stop the spread and reopen safely, and we're going to keep making sure it's widely available here in Boston," said Mayor Walsh. "If you think you might be sick, or if you've been in a group without distancing or masks, get tested. Thank you to the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center for your partnership in making COVID-19 testing more accessible for more residents."

The dates and hours of operation at Moakley Park on Old Colony Avenue near 1187 Columbia Road in South Boston are: 

  • Tuesday, August 4th to Friday, August 7th: 2:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m. 

  • Saturday, August 8th: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 

  • Tuesday, August 11th to Friday, August 14th: 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

  • Saturday, August 15th: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 

The pop-up testing initiative was announced by Mayor Walsh back in May as a way to help fill any gaps in testing availability, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. The site was located at the Washington Park Mall in Roxbury in June and most recently at the BCYF Jackson Mann Community Center in Allston. In Allston, over the course of 10 days, there were 3,205 COVID-19 tests conducted. Of 2,504 results received so far, approximately 1% tested positive for COVID-19. 

"We are glad to be partnering with the City of Boston to provide pop-up testing sites throughout the city," said East Boston Neighborhood Health Center president and CEO Manny Lopes. "Testing is one of the ways that we can mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and by offering accessible testing at sites in Boston, we are able to minimize the spread especially among our most vulnerable populations. For 50 years, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center has served residents of Boston regardless of status and we will continue to do so, even in the face of new challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic."

In addition to the City's pop-up and mobile testing sites, COVID-19 testing is available at over 20 locations across the city. Mobile testing sites also continue to be available at select locations, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. Individuals can call the Mayor's Health Line with any questions using 617-534-5050. For a complete list of all testing sites, visit here

The City of Boston has been partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. As of July 27, 2020, there were 115,712 COVID-19 tests of Boston residents. Of 115,712 total tests of Boston residents, 12.5 percent have tested positive, which is down from 13.3 percent reported through July 20. The latest numbers of cases by Boston neighborhoods are available here.

Mayor Walsh and the Boston Resiliency Fund Steering Committee have dedicated over $1,720,000 to expand COVID-19 testing and conduct culturally appropriate outreach and education to community health centers across City of Boston neighborhoods, including Bowdoin Street Community Health Center, Codman Square Community Health Center, The Dimock Center, DotHouse Health, Mattapan Community Health Center, Uphams Corner Community Health Center, Whittier Street Community Health Center, Charles River Community Health, Fenway Health, Greater Roslindale Medical & Dental Center, Harbor Health, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center, South Boston Community Health Center, NEW Health Charlestown, South End Community Health Center, and Brookside Community Health Center. The Fund has also supported telehealth services and equipment at those community health centers as well to connect testing to safe treatment options at home.

Resources and information about COVID-19 are available online. Resources available on boston.gov and through City departments include support for renters and homeowners; small businesses; free meals for Boston students; free toiletries for Boston students; support for older residents; information on homeless shelters; resources for those in recovery or those who have a substance use disorder; and mental health resources. More information on Boston's reopening can be found at boston.gov/reopening.

For additional questions or programs, please visit our coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.


###


Aug 03
Mosquito Spraying Planned for East Boston, West Roxbury and Hyde Park

Monday, August 3, 2020 - The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) advises residents and community members in East Boston, Hyde Park and West Roxbury of upcoming spraying to help control mosquito populations in selected neighborhood areas. BPHC partners with the Suffolk County Mosquito Control Project (SCMCP) to protect Boston residents from mosquito-borne disease transmission. 

SCMCP will be using a truck mounted aerosol sprayer to apply a formula that contains the pesticide, sumithrin, to control mosquitoes. The spraying happens between sunset and 11:30pm.

  • On Monday, August 10, 2020, spraying is scheduled in East Boston for neighborhoods located near Orient Heights, including streets in the vicinity of Orient Ave., Boardman St., Andrew Rd. and Horace St.  If spraying is postponed, it will be rescheduled for Wednesday, August 12, 2020.

  • On Tuesday, August 11, 2020, spraying is scheduled for neighborhoods of West Roxbury that are located east of Centre St., east of Grove St., west of Washington St. and south of Lagrange St. Enneking Parkway and Turtle Pond Parkway in Hyde Park will also be sprayed. If spraying is postponed, it will be rescheduled for Thursday, August 13, 2020.

Residents do not need to take any special precautions for this application. As with any pesticide, people should minimize exposure. If residents see a spray truck approaching, they are advised to go indoors for a couple of minutes while the spray dissipates. Residents are also advised to close windows during and immediately following spraying. Beekeepers do not need to take any special precautions since spraying begins after dusk.

About Sumithrin: Sumithrin is a synthetic pyrethroid that is classified as slightly toxic by the EPA. Mosquito control applications of sumithrin do not pose a significant risk to people or their pets due to the low toxicity of sumithrin and the small amount used to control mosquitoes.

Mosquitoes in Boston are most active from dusk to dawn during the months of July to September. However, mosquitoes can spread disease until the first hard frost (as late as November). Mosquito species have different breeding habits, but most want to lay their eggs near water – usually in vegetation or in still water. To help prevent mosquitoes from breeding, BPHC advises residents to limit places around the home where standing water can collect. Residents should turn over unused flowerpots, buckets, wheelbarrows and garbage cans; remove leaves and other debris that can clog gutters and trap water; dispose of or cover old tires; and cover swimming pools when not in use.

BPHC partners with the SCMCP to control the mosquito population in certain areas of Boston. SCMCP collects mosquito samples in traps every week during the summer and fall. Those mosquito samples are tested to see if West Nile Virus (WNV) or Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) are present. Mosquito control measures are also implemented during the summer and fall months. Wetlands, storm drains and other areas around the city are treated to limit the number of mosquitoes by killing mosquito larvae. In April of 2020, there were sprayings in Hyde Park and West Roxbury. Click here for more information about the mosquito control work of BPHC and its partnership with SCMCP.

For further information contact the Suffolk County Mosquito Control Project at 781-899-5730.

Fact sheets on mosquito-borne illnesses are available in English, Chinese, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, Spanish and Vietnamese.

###


Jul 25
Mayor Walsh Declares Heat Emergency, Opens Cooling Centers to All Residents

Friday, July 24, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today declared a heat emergency in the City of Boston beginning Sunday, July 26 through Tuesday, July 28 when the real feel temperature is expected to range between 95 and 102 degrees. To help residents stay cool, Boston Centers for Youth & Families (BCYF) community centers will be open to the public as cooling centers on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Monday and Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The City's two outdoor pools, BCYF Clougherty Pool in Charlestown and the BCYF Mirabella Pool in the North End, will be open from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Visitors must register for a swim time slot at Boston.gov/BCYF-Summer.

"We are opening our cooling centers for all residents to have the option to come in and cool off in air conditioning," said Mayor Walsh. "In addition, we'll have two outdoor pools open that are open for Boston residents. I want to remind everyone that COVID-19 is still a threat. Everyone needs to keep doing their part to avoid large crowds and wear your face covering, unless you're in the water."

Twenty-one BCYF community centers will be open for residents to use the air conditioned rooms to cool off. A full list of centers including hours of operation is available here. Due to COVID-19 public health regulations, residents are advised to call before visiting to confirm occupancy limits. All cooling center visitors will be screened before entry and must wear a face covering (covering both the nose and mouth), maintain 6 feet of distance from others, and wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Visitors must bring their own water bottles and water, and must limit belongings to one small bag. Occupancy will be monitored to ensure it doesn't exceed 40 percent of the building's maximum permitted occupancy to maintain proper distancing and the spaces will be regularly cleaned and disinfected hourly.

The City's two outdoor pools, the BCYF Clougherty Pool in Charlestown and the BCYF Mirabella Pool in the North End, are now open seven days a week through Labor Day from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there are several new protocols in place at the outdoor pools. Capacity has been reduced to less than 40 percent capacity or 75 people per session and you must register for a swim time slot ahead of time as walk-ins will not be allowed. Registration opens 24 hours before the following day's sessions at Boston.gov/BCYF-Summer. The 16 indoor pools operated by Boston Centers for Youth & Families (BCYF) are open only for participating youth attending in-person summer programming at this time.

Tot sprays are open at playgrounds in the City, with restrictions. Boston Public Libraries and indoor City-operated pools remain closed to the public at this time due to COVID-19 safety measures. 

Information on heat safety tips can be found online at boston.gov/heat and by following @CityofBoston on Twitter. Residents can sign up for Alert Boston, the City's emergency notification system, to receive emergency alerts by phone, email or text. Sign up online here. Residents are also encouraged to call 311 with any questions about available city services.

The Mayor issued the following heat safety tips for all members of the public:

  • Children and pets should never be left alone in vehicles, even for short periods of time.

  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of fluids regardless of activity level. Avoid alcoholic beverages and liquids high in sugar or caffeine.

  • Adults and children should use sunscreen containing an SPF-30 or higher and wear protective, loose-fitting clothing, including long sleeve shirts and hats.

  • Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours. Rest often in shady areas and be extra cautious from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., when the sun's UV radiation is strongest.

  • Know the signs of heat exhaustion. Heavy sweating, cool and clammy skin, dizziness, nausea, and muscle aches could all be signs of heat exhaustion. If symptoms persist, call 911 immediately. Do not delay care. Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the US and can exacerbate underlying illnesses.

  • Keep cool with showers, shade, and air conditioning or fans. The City's two outdoor pools, Urban wilds and tot sprays at playgrounds are open in Boston. When visiting, residents should wear face coverings (unless in the spray), maintain 6 feet of distance, and wash hands before and after visiting.If it is cooler outside than at home, wear a face covering and find a shady spot outside. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering. If no AC is available:

    • Take frequent cool showers

    • Help find a non-sick family member or neighbor with AC to visit. Wear a face covering and stay 6 feet apart.

  • If you have a child in your home, use child window guards in addition to screens on any open window on the second story or above. Falls are the leading cause of injury for children under the age of six. 

  • Secure all window air conditioner units according to the manufacturer's specifications.

  • Please call or virtually check on neighbors, especially older adults, and people with disabilities.

Helping the Homeless:

  • If you see homeless individuals out in the heat who appear immobile or disoriented, please call 911. Please ask them if they need assistance.

  • The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) operates emergency shelters at 112 Southampton St. and 794 Massachusetts Ave. These facilities are air conditioned and open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

  • The City of Boston works closely with a network of shelter providers to ensure there is adequate shelter, food, water, and a cool respite from the heat.

  • Street outreach teams providing recovery services, including the Engagement Center behind 112 Southampton St., remain operating as normal during summertime weather. 

  • All sites (Shelters, the Engagement Center, comfort stations) are following COVID-19 guidelines by promoting handwashing, hand sanitizer, and face coverings. Guests are provided sunscreen and water. Nursing teams are onsite to support. 

Playground Safety:  

  • Children should always wear shoes on playgrounds because surfaces can become extremely hot and cause burns, even splash pads and spray decks.

  • Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, children should wear a face covering (except while in the water), stay 6 feet away from others, and wash/sanitize hands before and after play. 

Beach Safety:

  • Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), if going to a beach or a large body of water, it is important to wear a face covering unless in the water, stay 6 feet apart from others, and avoid crowds due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. 

  • Don't wear face coverings in the water because they can be difficult to breathe through when they're wet. This means it is particularly important to maintain social distancing in the water. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering.

Outdoor Fires and Grilling:

  • No outdoor fires are allowed in Boston, including fire pits, chimineas, and bonfires.

  • Charcoal grills must be on the ground and away from buildings. Keep in mind the wind and never leave unattended. When done, dispose of the ash in a metal container once completely out.

  • Propane tank grills are only allowed on first floor porches with steps to the ground. Do not place propane tank grills near air conditioners or up against a building. Make sure all connections are tight and never carry propane tanks into a home.

  • Grills should always be used in a well-ventilated area.

###


Jul 24
Keeping Cool During COVID-19

​Residents are encouraged to seek out cooling in ways which minimize risk of spreading COVID-19. Below are some tips to share to stay safe and healthy during a period of increased heat:

Virtually check-in on at-risk clients, family, friends and neighbors

  • Encourage use of the AC, even if only for a few hours 

  • Help find a non-sick family member or neighbor with AC to visit

  • Be sure to wear a face mask, stay 6 ft apart, and wash your hands frequently 

  • Encourage frequent cool showers

When it is this hot outside, you need to limit outdoor activity, especially during the hottest periods of the day. If you go outside:

  • Take frequent breaks from your activity

  • Drink plenty of fluids regardless of activity level

  • Avoid alcoholic, sugary and caffeinated beverages

  • Use sunscreen containing an SPF-30 or higher

Stay hydrated and wear light, loose clothing!

If it is cooler outside than at home:

Seek medical care if you are feeling unwell:

  • Watch out for symptoms and signs of heat illness

  • If feeling sick or experiencing heat-related illness, do not delay care 

  • Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the US and can exacerbate underlying illnesses

  • Call your provider, or in an emergency, call 911


Residents can follow @CityOfBoston and @HealthyBoston on Twitter and sign-up for AlertBoston, the City's emergency notification system, to receive the latest updates. Residents are also encouraged to call 311 with any questions about available city services.

Visit www.boston.gov/heat for more information

 


Jul 21
Mayor Walsh Announces Free Pop-Up COVID-19 Testing in Allston

​Tuesday, July 21, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced that the City of Boston, in partnership with the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, is offering confidential COVID-19 testing at no cost for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals at a pop-up location in Allston. The COVID-19 testing initiative will be available for residents starting today, Tuesday, July 21 to Saturday, August 1 at BCYF Jackson Mann Community Center located at 500 Cambridge Street in Allston. Testing is available to anyone by walk-up only. Registration is not mandatory, but residents are encouraged to register in advance by calling (617) 568-4500. 

"COVID-19 testing is fundamental to individuals and families' clarity, and it's also important for guiding our gradual and safe reopening plans. As a City, we will continue to place the health and safety of our residents as our top priority so we must continue to make decisions based on public health data," said Mayor Walsh. "Thank you to the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center for your partnership in making COVID-19 testing more accessible for more residents."

The dates and hours of operation at BCYF Jackson Mann Community Center are: 

Tuesday, July 21 - Friday, July 24: 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Saturday, July 25: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Tuesday, July 28- Friday, July 31: 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Saturday, August 1: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.  

In addition to the pop-up site in Allston, COVID-19 testing is available at over 20 locations across the city. Mobile testing sites also continue to be available at select locations, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. Individuals can call the Mayor's Health Line with any questions using 617-534-5050. For a complete list of all testing sites, visit here

The City of Boston has been partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. As of July 13, 2020, there have been 99,279 COVID-19 tests of Boston residents of which 14.2 percent have testing positive, down from 15.2 percent reported through July 6, 2020. The incidence rate of COVID-19 has been higher for East Boston, Mattapan, Hyde Park and Dorchester compared to the rest of Boston. Of cases where race/ethnicity was known, as of July 17, 4 percent were Asian, 37 percent were Black, 28 percent were Hispanic or Latino, 25 percent were white, and 7 percent identified as multi-racial or another racial/ethnic group. The latest numbers of cases by Boston neighborhoods are available here.

Mayor Walsh and the Boston Resiliency Fund Steering Committee have dedicated over $1,720,000 to expand COVID-19 testing and conduct culturally appropriate outreach and education to community health centers across City of Boston neighborhoods, including Bowdoin Street Community Health Center, Codman Square Community Health Center, The Dimock Center, DotHouse Health, Mattapan Community Health Center, Uphams Corner Community Health Center, Whittier Street Community Health Center, Charles River Community Health, Fenway Health, Greater Roslindale Medical & Dental Center, Harbor Health, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center,  Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center, South Boston Community Health Center, NEW Health Charlestown, South End Community Health Center, and Brookside Community Health Center. The Fund has also supported telehealth services and equipment at those community health centers as well to connect testing to safe treatment options at home.

Resources and information about COVID-19 are available online. Resources available on boston.gov and through City departments include support for renters and homeowners; small businesses; free meals for Boston students; free toiletries for Boston students; support for older residents; information on homeless shelters; resources for those in recovery or those who have a substance use disorder; and mental health resources. More information on Boston's reopening can be found at boston.gov/reopening.

For additional questions or programs, please visit our coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.

 

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Jul 17
Mayor Walsh Declares Heat Emergency, Opens 20 BCYF Community Centers as Cooling Centers to all Residents

​Friday, July 17, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today declared a Heat Emergency in the City of Boston in anticipation of the hot and humid weather that is forecasted through Tuesday of next week. Select Boston Centers for Youth & Families (BCYF) community centers will be open to the public as cooling centers on Sunday, July 19 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Monday, July 20, 2020 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. when the real feel temperature is expected to range between 96 and 100 degrees.

"Please take the necessary steps to protect yourself from COVID-19 and from the heat and humidity that we expect over the weekend," said Mayor Walsh. "Continue to practice social distancing, avoid crowds, wash your hands often, and wear a face covering. If the face covering causes you to overheat, find a shaded area where you can maintain 6 feet of distance from others, and then remove the face covering so that you can breathe easily and cool down."

Twenty BCYF community centers will be open for residents to use the air conditioned rooms to cool off. Tot sprays are open at playgrounds in the City, with restrictions. Boston Public Libraries and City-operated pools remain closed to the public at this time due to COVID-19 safety measures. A full list of centers including hours of operation is available here.

Due to COVID-19 public health regulations, residents are advised to call before visiting to confirm hours and occupancy limits. All cooling center visitors will be screened before entry and must wear a face covering (covering both the nose and mouth), maintain 6 feet of distance from others, and wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Visitors must bring their own water bottles and water, and must limit belonging to one small bag. Occupancy will be monitored to ensure it doesn't exceed 40 percent of the building's maximum permitted occupancy to maintain proper distancing and the spaces will be regularly cleaned and disinfected hourly.

Information on heat safety tips can be found online at boston.gov/heat and by following @CityofBoston on Twitter. Residents can sign up for Alert Boston, the City's emergency notification system, to receive emergency alerts by phone, email or text. Sign up online here. Residents are also encouraged to call 311 with any questions about available city services.

The Mayor issued the following heat safety tips for all members of the public:

  • Children and pets should never be left alone in vehicles, even for short periods of time.

  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of fluids regardless of activity level. Avoid alcoholic beverages and liquids high in sugar or caffeine.

  • Adults and children should use sunscreen containing an SPF-30 or higher and wear protective, loose-fitting clothing, including long sleeve shirts and hats.

  • Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours. Rest often in shady areas and be extra cautious from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., when the sun's UV radiation is strongest.

  • Know the signs of heat exhaustion. Heavy sweating, cool and clammy skin, dizziness, nausea, and muscle aches could all be signs of heat exhaustion. If symptoms persist, call 911 immediately. Do not delay care. Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the US and can exacerbate underlying illnesses.

  • Keep cool with showers, shade, and air conditioning or fans. Urban wilds and tot sprays at playgrounds are open in the City. When visiting, residents should wear face coverings (unless in the spray), maintain 6 feet of distance, and wash hands before and after visiting.If it is cooler outside than at home, wear a face covering and find a shady spot outside. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering. If no AC is available:

    • Take frequent cool showers

    • Help find a non-sick family member or neighbor with AC to visit. Wear a face covering and stay 6 feet apart.

  • If you have a child in your home, use child window guards in addition to screens on any open window on the second story or above. Falls are the leading cause of injury for children under the age of six. 

  • Secure all window air conditioner units according to the manufacturer's specifications.

  • Please call or virtually check on neighbors, especially older adults, and people with disabilities.

Helping the homeless:

  • If you see homeless individuals out in the heat who appear immobile or disoriented, please call 911. Please ask them if they need assistance.

  • The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) operates emergency shelters at 112 Southampton St. and 794 Massachusetts Ave. These facilities are air conditioned and open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

  • The City of Boston works closely with a network of shelter providers to ensure there is adequate shelter, food, water, and a cool respite from the heat.

  • Street outreach teams providing recovery services, including the Engagement Center behind 112 Southampton St., remain operating as normal during summertime weather. 

  • All sites (Shelters, the Engagement Center, comfort stations) are following COVID-19 guidelines by promoting handwashing, hand sanitizer, and face coverings. Guests are provided sunscreen and water. Nursing teams are onsite to support. 

Playground safety:  

  • Children should always wear shoes on playgrounds because surfaces can become extremely hot and cause burns, even splash pads and spray decks.

  • Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, children should wear a face covering (except while in the water), stay 6 feet away from others, and wash/sanitize hands before and after play. 

Beach safety:

  • Don't wear face coverings in the water because they can be difficult to breathe through when they're wet. This means it is particularly important to maintain social distancing in the water. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering.

Outdoor fires and grilling:

  • No outdoor fires are allowed in Boston, including fire pits, chimineas, and bonfires.

  • Charcoal grills must be on the ground and away from buildings. Keep in mind the wind and never leave unattended. When done, dispose of the ash in a metal container once completely out.

  • Propane tank grills are only allowed on first floor porches with steps to the ground. Do not place propane tank grills near air conditioners or up against a building. Make sure all connections are tight and never carry propane tanks into a home.

  • Grills should always be used in a well-ventilated area.

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Jul 14
City Public Health Officials Announce Season’s First West Nile Virus-Positive Mosquito Sample

​Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) announced today that West Nile Virus (WNV) has been detected in mosquitoes in Boston for the first time this year. The presence of WNV was confirmed today by the Massachusetts State Public Health Laboratory in a mosquito sample collected on July 9, 2020 in Brighton. No human or animal cases of WNV or Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) have been detected so far this year in the City of Boston. Although there is no elevated risk level or risk-level change associated with this finding, BPHC advises residents to prevent mosquito bites and to mosquito-proof their homes.

“While much of the attention right now is on the COVID-19 pandemic and slowing the spread of this virus, we cannot lose sight of the importance of protecting ourselves against mosquito bites and the serious diseases they may carry,” said Boston Public Health Commission Interim Executive Director Rita Nieves. “I encourage everyone to take the precautions necessary as they spend more time outdoors.”

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a rare but serious disease most often spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. At this time, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has no data to suggest that COVID-19 is spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way that COVID-19 spreads is from person to person.

WNV has been detected in Boston mosquitoes during the summer and fall months (June – November) every year since 2000, but WNV in people is rare. In 2019, there were no human cases of WNV infection diagnosed in Boston residents. In 2018, there were seven human cases of WNV infection diagnosed in Boston residents.

“It is typical to find West Nile Virus in mosquitoes in Boston at this time of year,” said BPHC Medical Director Dr. Jennifer Lo. “There is not an elevated risk level in Boston right now. However, if you are going to be spending time outside, you need to be thinking about prevention and protection against mosquito bites. That includes using an approved mosquito repellent, draining standing water from your yard and repairing window screens to keep mosquitos out of your home.”

While WNV can infect people of all ages, people over the age of 50 are at higher risk for severe disease. Most people infected with WNV will have no symptoms. When present, WNV symptoms tend to include fever and flu-like illness. In rare cases, more severe illness can occur.  There is no vaccine or specific antiviral treatments for West Nile Virus infection. The most effective way to avoid WNV is to take measures to prevent mosquito bites.

Mosquitoes in Boston are most active from dusk to dawn during the months of July to September, but mosquitoes can spread disease until the first hard frost (as late as November). The risk can be reduced by using insect repellent when outdoors, especially from dusk to dawn and, when possible, wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants. Residents should also make sure that their window and door screens are in good repair to prevent mosquitoes from getting inside. To help prevent mosquitoes from breeding, BPHC advises residents to empty standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

Preventing Mosquito Bites:

    • Use Mosquito repellent

      • Use repellents containing DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus, picaridin or IR3535. 

      • Always read the directions on the label.

      • Apply DEET to exposed skin (avoid eyes and mouth) and on clothes, but not on open cuts or wounds. 

      • After going inside, wash off repellent with soap and water. If the product has been applied directly to clothing, wash it before wearing again.

      • Do not use DEET concentrations of more than 30%.

      • Do not let children apply repellents themselves. Avoid children’s eyes, mouth, or hands and use them cautiously around ears.

      • Do not use DEET on infants under two months of age (mosquito netting can be used over infant carriers) or oil of lemon eucalyptus on children under 3 years of age.

      • Use only repellents approved for use on animals on pets.

    • Cover up

      • Wear protective clothing such as long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks whenever possible. Tuck your shirt into your pants to keep mosquitoes from going under your clothes.

    • Mosquito proof your home and stop breeding in and around your yard

      • Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water, so it is important to make sure items around your home do not collect any water. It only takes one week for mosquito larvae living in water to grow into biting adults. Turn over unused flowerpots, buckets, wheelbarrows and garbage cans; remove leaves and other debris that can clog gutters and trap water; dispose of or cover old tires; and cover swimming pools when not in use.

      • Make sure window and door screens do not have holes in them. Screens in good condition will help prevent mosquitoes from getting inside your home.

    • Protect your animals

      • Pet owners should speak with their veterinarian about mosquito repellents approved for use in animals and vaccinations to prevent WNV and EEE.

Citywide Prevention Efforts:

BPHC partners with the Suffolk County Mosquito Control Project (SCMCP) to protect Boston residents from mosquito-borne illnesses and to control the mosquito population in certain areas of Boston. SCMCP collects mosquito samples in traps every week during the summer and fall. Those mosquito samples are tested to see if WNV or EEE are present. Mosquito control measures are also implemented during the summer and fall months. Wetlands, storm drains and other areas around the city are treated to limit the number of mosquitoes by killing mosquito larvae.

In April of 2020, there were sprayings in Hyde Park and West Roxbury. For more information about the sprayings, reach out to SCMCP at 781-899-5730. For a full list of any upcoming spraying, please visit bphc.org/mosquitocontrol.

For More Information:

###

Media Contact:

Caitlin McLaughlin

cmclaughlin@bphc.org

(857) 393-0002


Jul 07
Nearly 350 Public Health Organizations Implore HHS Secretary Azar to Support CDC’s Critical Role in the COVID-19 Response

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2020 - Today, the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) joined nearly 350 other Public Health Organizations to implore Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar to support the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's critical role in the COVID-19 pandemic response in the United States. The letter relased today said the expertise of the CDC and all public health agencies is critical to protecting Americans’ health during this ongoing crisis.

Click here to read the letter.

The authoring organizations, including BPHC, the American Public Health Association, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Big Cities Health Coalition, National Association of County and City Health Officials and Trust for America’s Health,  expressed “deep concern” about increasing reports of resistance to evidence-based public health messages and threats to public health leaders and agencies, and called on the Secretary to be an advocate for public health.

At this sentinel moment, during the worst public health emergency in over a century, all of the nation’s leaders must resist any efforts that would undermine the critical role of the CDC to respond to the pandemic and must be an advocate for increased investment in public health, said the letter signatories.

“Secretary Azar, we urge you to speak up and amplify the critical role of CDC and that of all public health agencies during this monumental crisis,” the letter said.

The public health community’s work to respond to the pandemic, via the federal government, including within the CDC, and at the state, local, territorial and tribal levels, has been tireless but has been hamstrung by shrunken programs and inadequate technology; the result of decades of underfunding.

Public health leaders are calling attention to the need for CDC to play a central role as the nation’s navigates the COVID-19 pandemic, including:

“CDC is the world’s premier public health institution and should be treated as such during this pandemic. It must be appropriately funded and allowed to speak based on the best available science and with an unfettered voice,” said John Auerbach, President and CEO of Trust for America’s Health.

“When you look at the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, countries that listen to and prioritize public health fare best,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the CDC, President and CEO of Resolve to Save Lives, an initiative of Vital Strategies. “Trying to fight this pandemic without daily, public guidance from the CDC is like fighting with one hand tied behind your back.”

“There’s no federal agency better suited to lead the response to this unprecedented pandemic. CDC has experts who have studied and helped control coronaviruses and other viral threats for decades, and can help our country emerge from this crisis,” said Dr. Julie Gerberding, former director of the CDC, Co-Chair CSIS Commission on Strengthening America’s Health Security.

The COVID-19 crisis has also illuminated the ways in which racial inequities impact health. Higher rates of COVID-19 deaths within communities of color illustrate the importance of all of CDC’s work, including its focus on chronic disease prevention. It is not possible to effectively meet the needs of the American people if that scope is narrowed.

The letter furthermore calls on Secretary Azar to be an advocate for increased funding for CDC’s core budget. While emergency supplemental funding has been critical to begin to address the immediate COVID-19 response needs, robust, sustained, and predictable funding for its full public health mission is essential to sustain its public health activities and to prevent the next emergency.  Increasing the federal investment in public health will be particularly important, as state and local government budgets are likely to be severely hampered in the coming fiscal year due to tax revenue losses during the COVID-19 related economic shutdown.

Today’s laser focus should be on preventing further deaths and disruptions due to the pandemic and the CDC, as the world’s premier public health institution, should be at the helm of that effort, the letter said. Once the pandemic is controlled, the CDC, other federal agencies, state and local leaders and the public health community should collaboratively evaluate their performance and must acknowledge and address shortcomings of the response in order to be better prepared for the next public health emergency.

Signing the letter were:

1,000 Days

Academic Health Resource

Academy for Eating Disorders

Action on Smoking and Health

Advocates for Better Children’s Diets

AES Consulting

AFSCME

AIDS Alliance for Women, Infants, Children, Youth & Families

AIDS United

AlohaCare

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Alliance of WI

Alzheimer’s Association

Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM)

Alzheimer’s of Central Alabama

Alzheimer’s Orange County

American Academy of Family Physicians

American Academy of Pediatrics

American Academy of Pediatrics, California

American Association for Clinical Chemistry

American Association for Dental Research

American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

American Association on Health and Disability

American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN)

American College Health Association

American College of Clinical Pharmacy

American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP)

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

American College of Physicians

American College of Preventive Medicine

American Council on Exercise

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

American Geriatrics Society

American Heart Association

American Kidney Fund

American Lung Association

American Medical Women’s Association

American Organization for Nursing Leadership

American Public Health Association

American School Health Association

American Sexual Health Association

American Society for Clinical Pathology

American Society for Microbiology

American Society of Hematology

American Society of Pediatric Nephrology

American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

American Thoracic Society

American University Department of Health Studies

APLA Health

Arizona Community Health Workers Association

Arizona Public Health Association

Art & Science of Health Promotion Institute

Asian Health Coalition

Asian Health Services

Association for Prevention Teaching and Research

Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology

Association of American Cancer Institutes

Association of American Medical Colleges

Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO)

Association of Food and Drug Officials

Association of Immunization Managers

Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs

Association of Minority Health Professions Schools

Association of Ohio Health Commissioners

Association of Population Centers

Association of Public Health Laboratories

Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health

Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials

Association of State Public Health Nutritionists

Autistic Self Advocacy Network

Big Cities Health Coalition

Bipartisan Policy Center

Black AIDS Institute

Black Men’s Health Initiative

Boston Public Health Commission

Bristol Health Equity Zone

Bronx Health REACH

California Coalition for Children’s Safety and Health

California Immunization Coalition

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network

California School Nurses Organization

Cambridge Public Health Department

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Cancer Council of the Pacific Islands

Caring Ambassadors Program

Cascade AIDS Project

Center for Community Resilience

Center for Health and Learning

Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)

CenterLink: The Community of LGBT Centers

Ceres Community Project

ChangeLab Solutions

Child Welfare League of America

Children’s Environmental Health Network

Children’s Mental Health Network

Christian Council of Delmarva

City of Houston Health Department

City of Milwaukee of Health Department

Climate for Health, ecoAmerica

Coalition for a Tobacco Free Arkansas

Coalition of National Health Education Organizations

Cohen Veterans Bioscience

Colorado Association of Local Public Health Officials

Colorado Public Health Association

Colorado Public Health Nursing Leaders

Community Access National Network

Community Education Group

Connecticut Public Health Association

Cooley’s Anemia Foundation

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists

Counter Tools

County Health Executives Association of California

Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Delaware Academy of Medicine

Delaware Academy of Medicine / Delaware Public Health Association

Delaware Academy of Medicine and the Delaware Public Health Association

East Shore District Health Dept.

Eating Disorders Coalition for Research, Policy & Action

Education Development Center

Element Health, Inc.

Endocrine Society

Enlace Chicago

Epilepsy Alliance America

Equality California

Eta Sigma Gamma

Families USA

Family Voices

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Information Network

FHI 360

FIRST Family Service Center

Fletcher Group, Inc.

Florida Institute for Health Innovation

Florida Public Health Association

Foundation for Healthy Generations

Galaxy Aviation Corp

Gateway Region YMCA

George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication

GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing LGBTQ Equality

Global Alliance for Behavioral Health and Social Justice

Global Health Council

Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC)

Global Healthy Living Foundation

Global Liver Institute

Grand Traverse County Health Department

Green & Healthy Homes Initiative

Harm Reduction Michigan

Hawaii Public Health Association

Hawaii State Dept of Health, Office of Primary Care and Rural Health

Health by Design

Health Care Improvement Foundation

Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO)

Health Resources in Action

Healthcare Foundation Northern Sonoma County

Healthcare Ready

HealthHIV

HealthPartners Institute

Healthy Schools Campaign

Healthy Weight Partnership Inc.

Heartland Alliance

Hep B United

Hepatitis B Foundation

HIV Medicine Association

Hogg Foundation for Mental Health

Hope and Help Center of Central Florida, Inc.

Idaho Public Health Association

Immunization Action Coalition

Immunize Nevada

Impetus – Let’s Get Started LLC

Indiana Public Health Association

Infectious Diseases Society of America

Institute for Family Health

Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS)

International Association of Emergency Managers

International Association of Fire Chiefs

IWC Resources, LP

Jeffrey Modell Foundation

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

Jump IN for Healthy Kids

Kaplan Health Innovations

Kentucky Health Departments Association

KidsAndCars.org

Lakeshore Foundation

League of American Bicyclists

Linn County Public Health

Louisiana Community Health Worker Outreach Network

Louisiana Public Health Association

Lupus and Allied Diseases Association, Inc.

Macoupin County Public Health Department

Maine Public Health Association

March of Dimes

MaryCatherine Jones Consulting, LLC

Maryland Association of County Health Officers (MACHO)

Maryland Office of Minority Health

Massachusetts Public Health Association

Medicago

MEND Foundation

Metropolitan Group

Michigan Association for Local Public Health

MindWise Innovations

Minneapolis Health Department

Mississippi Public Health Institute

Montana Public Health Association

Monterey County Health Department

Morehouse School of Medicine

MountainCare

Multnomah County Health Department

NAPHSIS

NASTAD

National Adult Day Services Association

National Association of Chronic Disease Directors

National Association of Community Health Workers

National Association of County and City Health Officials

National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

National Association of School Nurses

National Athletic Trainers’ Association

National Birth Equity Collaborative

National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Columbia University

National Center for Healthy Housing

National Coalition for LGBT Health

National Coalition for the Homeless

National Coalition of STD Directors

National Environmental Health Association (NEHA)

National Forum for Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention

National Hemophilia Foundation

National Kidney Foundation

National Lipid Association

National Medical Association (NMA)

National Network of Public Health Institutes

National Nurse-Led Care Consortium

National Prevention Science Coalition to Improve Lives

National REACH Coalition

National Safety Council

National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable

National WIC Association

Nebraska Association of Local Health Directors

Network for Environmental & Economic Responsibility of United Church of Christ

Nevada Public Health Organization

Nevada Rural Hospital Partners

New Jersey Association of County and City Health Officials

New Jersey Public Health Association

New York State Public Health Association

North Carolina Healthcare Foundation

Northwest Center for Public Health Practice

NYU Grossman School of Medicine

NYU School of Global Public Health

Ohio Public Health Association

Onyx Strategic Consulting LLC

Pacific Island Health Officers Association

Partnering for Community Transformation Inc

Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease

Partnership to Fight Infectious Disease

PATH

Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation

Pawtucket Central Falls Health Equity Zone

Peggy Lillis Foundation

Pennsylvania Public Health Association

PFLAG National

Population Association of America

Population Health Alliance

Prevent Blindness

Prevent Child Abuse America

Prevention Institute

Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association

Public Health Advocates

Public Health Alliance of Southern California

Public Health Foundation

Public Health Institute

Public Health Law Center

Public Health Solutions

Puerto Rico Public Health Association

Pulmonary Hypertension Association

Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness GWU

Research!America

Residential Eating Disorders Consortium

Resolve to Save Lives, an initiative of Vital Strategies

Respiratory Health Association

Rhode Island Department of Health

RiverStone Health

Rural Health Association of Tennessee

Rural Health Association of Utah

Safe Routes Partnership

Safe States Alliance

Samueli Integrative Health Programs

SANIPLAN

School-Based Health Alliance

SF Hep B Free – Bay Area

SHAPE America – Society of Health and Physical Educators

Shoals Community Clinic

Silver State Equality-Nevada

Smoke Free St. Joe

Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research

Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

Society for Public Health Education

Society of State Leaders of Health and Physical Education

Southern California Public Health Association

Southwick BOH

Stanislaus County Medical Society

Susan G. Komen

Tennessee Justice Center

Tennessee Public Health Association

Texas Public Health Association

The AIDS Institute

The Broussard Company

The Center for Community Resilience, George Washington University

The Consortium

The Foundation for Sustainable Communities

The George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center

The Gerontological Society of America

The Immunization Partnership

The John A. Hartford Foundation

The Los Angeles Trust for Children’s Health

The National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc

The Nourished Principles, LLC

The Permanente Medical Group

Thomas Jefferson University

Training Resources Network, Inc.

Treatment Action Group

Trust for America’s Health

Truth Initiative

U.S. Breastfeeding Committee

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health

United Ostomy Associations of America

United Way of Greenwood and Abbeville Counties

University of Washington Department of Global Health

University of Washington School of Nursing

University of Washington School of Public Health

University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute

Vaccinate Your Family

Washington State Association of Local Health Officials

Washington State Department of Health

Washington State Public Health Association

WelCore Health, LLC

West Valley Neighborhoods Coalition

Whitefoord

Winer Family Foundation

Wisconsin Public Health Association

Women Of A Certain Age

WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease

Women’s Resource Center

Woodhull Freedom Foundation

Xavier University for Population Health

YMCA of the USA

Zell Community Health Strategies

Click here to read the letter.

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Boston Public Health Commission
1010 Massachusetts Ave, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02118.
Phone:(617) 534-5395 Email: info@bphc.org