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Beverage Marketing Tactics

​In 2008, three of the largest beverage companies in the world spent over $4 billion on global marketing resulting in sugary beverages ads in almost every form of media, everywhere and in every way. Some are obvious, while others are more subtle. Below are just some of the ways the beverage industry markets to you and your community.

  • Television commercials 
  • Radio commercials 
  • Internet advertising 
  • Magazine ads
  • Billboards
  • Signage (park benches, buses, window posters, neon signs, etc.)
  • Product placement in movies and television programs
  • Philanthropy programs 
  • Contests/rewards
  • Celebrity endorsements 
  • Concerts/music festivals
  • Sponsorships

Are you a target?
Beverage marketers target specific groups by many factors, including age, income, location, gender, race or ethnicity, a practice is known as target marketing. From a marketing perspective, targeting allows the marketer to identify a desire in a particular consumer population, and then to use relevant marketing to satisfy it. 

For years, advertising of sugary drinks has been intentionally targeted toward Black and Latino populations, contributing to the disproportionate rates of obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases in these communities.  Even more than adults, marketers target impressionable youth, encouraging them to drink more sugary beverages and hoping to gain lifelong customers.  Don’t be a victim of advertising and don’t buy sugary beverages.

Youth Marketing Tactics: The beverage industry markets heavily toward impressionable children and teens. By associating products with popular movies, toys, video games, musicians and more, they conceal their marketing tactics.  Youth are much more likely to react to direct marketing tactics, which is educating them at a young age on the negative health effects of drinking sugary beverages is so important.

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Boston Public Health Commission
1010 Massachusetts Ave, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02118.
Phone:(617) 534-5395 Email: info@bphc.org