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Feb 09
Mayor Walsh Launches Additional Neighborhood Trauma Team in Grove Hall

BOSTON - Saturday, February 9, 2019 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced an additional Neighborhood Trauma Team dedicated to Grove Hall will soon begin its service, increasing capacity to the citywide network’s ability to support Boston residents impacted by trauma. Project RIGHT Inc. and Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center were selected to partner with the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) to further provide greater community outreach and support to Grove Hall residents.

“Being there for each other is at the heart of what makes Boston’s neighborhoods strong. Our trauma teams work collaboratively to coordinate a citywide response and recovery network,” said Mayor Walsh. “We are breaking the cycle of suffering by investing in neighborhood programs like these. It is an honor to announce that BPHC, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center and Project RIGHT are partnering to form this new neighborhood trauma team.” 

In his FY19 budget, Mayor Walsh made an additional investment of $284,000 to support the growth of the Neighborhood Trauma Team Network, bringing the total investment to $1,284,000 in the last three years. This additional investment further strengthened the citywide network of neighborhood trauma teams in Dorchester, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, East Boston, and Mattapan, that offer immediate support to residents and ongoing access to evidence-based trauma treatment.​

The Neighborhood Trauma Team Network provides resources that include:

  • Access to 24-hour trauma hotline at 617-431-0125, 
  • Immediate crisis response services, 
  • Referral to ongoing behavioral health services for individuals and families in need of ongoing and long-term support for trauma recovery, 
  • Trauma support during vigils, 
  • Memorial and funeral services, 
  • Support for neighborhood outreach and education, 
  • Trauma education and support at community meetings, and
  • Community coping/healing groups.


"The addition of the Grove Hall Neighborhood Trauma is a concerted effort between the City and our community partners to break the cycle of suffering that prevents our communities from thriving,” said Chief of Health and Human Services Marty Martinez. “While we work to strengthen our trauma services, we will continue to build trust and strengthen our connection to the community so our residents can confidently increase support systems and access vital resources in a time of most need."

Mayor Walsh launched the Neighborhood Trauma Teams to strengthen efforts to support Boston residents impacted by violence. Managed by the Boston Public Health Commission, and co-led in each neighborhood by teams consisting of a community health center and a community partner, the teams are supported through a combination of City funding and grants from Boston Children's Hospital and Partners HealthCare System. 

"This grant award is quite timely and much needed,” said Mike Kozu, co-interim director of Project RIGHT. “Too many of our young people and residents that have been exposed to violence have not addressed how the impact of trauma has affected their lives. We look forward to expand the support we provide in the community by being there after violence happens to share information about the services we offer as a Neighborhood Trauma Team."


“We know that gun violence disproportionately damages communities of color, and research proves that witnesses to gun violence are at serious risk for trauma, depression, anxiety and other devastating health problems,” said Stan A. McLaren, president and CEO of the Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center. “We are grateful that funding for this important initiative will help our community to address the aftermath of exposure to violence.” 


“We have intentionally built each of the teams as partnerships between a community group and a health center so that they can take an authentic and trauma-informed approach in the work they do. The addition of the Grove Hall team to the city’s NTT network has already added on-the-ground incident response capacity upon which we will build in the coming months,” said Monica Valdes Lupi, executive director of the Boston Public Health Commission. 

The Neighborhood Trauma Team Network is holding a series of Share-Outs and Listening Sessions across Boston in February and March:

Flyer for Share Outs and DIscussions for NTT in 2019


About the Boston Public Health Commission

The Boston Public Health Commission, one of the country's first health departments, is an independent public agency providing a wide range of health services and programs. It is governed by a seven-member board of health appointed by the Mayor of Boston.

Public service and access to quality health care are the cornerstones of our mission - to protect, preserve, and promote the health and well-being of all Boston residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable. The Commission's more than 40 programs are grouped into six bureaus: Child, Adolescent & Family Health; Community Health Initiatives; Homeless Services; Infectious Disease; Recovery Services; and Emergency Medical Services.

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Feb 07
National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

African Americans are the racial group most affected by HIV in the United States. In 2016, African Americans made up 12% of the US population, but accounted for 44% of new HIV cases. 


Here are some facts from 2016:

  • 17,528 African Americans received an HIV diagnosis in the United States (12,890 men and 4,560 women).

  • More than half (58%, 10,223) of African Americans who received an HIV diagnosis were gay or bisexual men.

  • Among African American gay and bisexual men who received an HIV diagnosis, 39% (3,993) were young men aged 25 to 34.

  • Forty-seven percent (8,501) of those who received an AIDS diagnosis in the United States were African American.

HIV Diagnoses in the United States for the Most-Affected Subpopulations, 2016



What can you do? Get educated. 
  • HIV can be spread when someone with HIV has unprotected sex (anal, vaginal or oral) or shares injection drug equipment with someone who does not have HIV. 

  • If an HIV-positive person is on medicine to treat HIV, the risk of infection is much lower.

  • Learn the facts about HIV.


Protect yourself against HIV. 

  • Limit your number of sex partners and use condoms every time you have sex.

  • Talk with your partner about their status and getting tested.

  • Talk with your health care provider about safer sex practices and getting tested.

  • Never share needles or “works” if you are injecting drugs. 

  • If you had a recent exposure to HIV, talk to your doctor right away about PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis). PEP must be started within 72 hours of exposure.

  • If you think you might be exposed to HIV in the future, ask your health care provider about PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis). 


Get tested for HIV. 

  • Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should get tested for HIV at least once.  
  • People who have unprotected sex, have multiple partners or are injection drug users should get tested more often. 
  • To find a testing site near you, visit GetTested or call the Mayor’s Health Line at 617-534-5050.
  • Talk to your health care provider about taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) daily to prevent HIV infection. 

Get treated. 

  • If you are HIV-positive, start treatment as soon as possible. 
  • Taking HIV medication can keep you feeling healthy and reduce your chance of spreading the virus to someone else. 

Help us fight HIV! Talk to your friends and family members about the importance of HIV prevention and treatment, and encourage them to get tested. To learn more about HIV, visit www.bphc.org/hiv


Feb 06
Mayor Walsh Nominates Phillomin Laptiste to Board of Health

Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced the nomination of Phillomin Laptiste to the Board of Health, the governing body of the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC). Laptiste brings extensive experience in community engagement and constituency building to the Board, and currently serves as the executive director of the Bowdoin Street Health Center, a community health center in Dorchester. Her appointment requires City Council approval.

"It is an honor to nominate Phillomin to be appointed to the Board of Health," said Mayor Walsh. "She is a notable advocate in creating a healthy, peaceful, and safe community through resident engagement. I am confident Phillomin will be a great addition to the Board as she understands the importance of creating social and physical environments that promote health for everyone."

Born and raised on Bowdoin Street, Laptiste served as manager of community health, operations manager and associate director at Bowdoin Street Health Center (BSHC) prior to being appointed to executive director. In her current role, she oversees health center operations and develops, implements, and evaluates health center programs in response to changing community and patient needs. She supervises BSHC's administrative staff, medical staff, and nursing management, and manages all external relationships and marketing efforts.

"I am extremely grateful for this opportunity," said Phillomin Laptiste, executive director of the Bowdoin Street Health Center. "Having worked closely with the Boston Public Health Commission over the last ten years in both a programmatic and advocacy capacity, I'm very excited to continue this work on a broader scale to impact change and ensure equity in the City of Boston."


"As the leader of one of Boston's vital community health centers, Phillomin shares our vision of a Boston where all residents can lead healthy lives free from racism, poverty, and violence," said BPHC Executive Director Monica Valdes Lupi, JD, MPH. "On behalf of the Board of Health and staff who are committed to advancing that vision, we look forward to having Phillomin contribute to our efforts."

Laptiste graduated from Boston Latin School, holds a bachelor's degree in Management and Organizational Communications from Emerson College and master's degree in Health Care Administration from Suffolk University. In 2015, she graduated with a certificate from the Massachusetts Institute for Community Health Leadership, one of only 19 professionals in the state to participate in this program.

Laptiste will assume the seat on the Board formerly held by Francis Doyle, who recently stepped down from to assume a role within the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The seven members of the Board of Health are appointed by the Mayor of Boston to serve three-year staggered terms. For more information on the Board of Health, please visit here.

About the Boston Public Health Commission

The Boston Public Health Commission, one of the country's first health departments, is an independent public agency providing a wide range of health services and programs. It is governed by a seven-member board of health appointed by the Mayor of Boston.

Public service and access to quality health care are the cornerstones of our mission - to protect, preserve, and promote the health and well-being of all Boston residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable.

 The Commission's more than 40 programs are grouped into six bureaus: Child, Adolescent & Family Health; Community Health Initiatives; Homeless Services; Infectious Disease; Recovery Services; and Emergency Medical Services.


Feb 06
Battling Cavities with National Children's Dental Health Month

Every February, the American Dental Association sponsors National Children's Dental Health Month to help increase awareness about the importance of oral health, especially for children. By creating healthy habits at a young age and encouraging regular visits to the dentist, parents and caregivers can help children get a good start on keeping good oral hygiene habits throughout their entire life!

Did you know?                       

  • Dental decay (cavities) is the MOST COMMON chronic, childhood disease in the United States.  Dental decay is 5 times more common than asthma, and 7 times more common than hay fever.

  • Children with dental decay/cavities can experience

  • Extreme pain                                                     

  • Spread of infection

  • Difficulty chewing, decreased nutrition

  • Extensive and costly dental treatment

  • Difficulty learning or focusing in class

  • Problems in speech development

  • Permanent teeth problems

  • Sleep disturbance

  • Decreased self esteem

  • Data has shown that 51 million school hours are lost per year from dental-related illness.

Rock Your Smile


The 2012 National Children's Dental Health Month slogan is "ROCK YOUR SMILE." Here at the BPHC Office of Oral Health, we want to help parents and caregivers keep their kids "Rocking their smile!" You can give us a call at 617-534-2359, send us an email (oralhealth@bphc.org), visit our website (www.bphc.org/oralhealth) or check us out on Facebook.com/BostonOralHealth

Got questions? Click on the below links for  information to help you keep your child's smile healthy!

Questions? Please contact the BPHC Office of Oral Health: oralhealth@bphc.org (617-534-2380) or visit www.bphc.org/oralhealth


Jan 22
Boston Biosafety Committee Meeting January 23, 2019

The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) is holding a meeting of the Boston Biosafety Committee, an advisory group appointed by the BPHC Executive Director under the BPHC Biological Laboratory Regulation.  


The meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 23, 2019 from 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm, at 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, 2nd Floor, Hayes Conference Room.




Jan 16
New App Puts Contacting 11,000+ Social Services in the Palm of Your Hand

Today, Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) announced the launch of its HelpSteps mobile app and website. The social services application is a collaborative effort between BCH, the Boston Public Health Commission, The Greater Boston Food Bank and the United Way/Mass2-1-1.

Every day I care for patients with unmet social needs that affect the health of the entire family. 15 years ago, I began developing what is now HelpSteps as a system for both screening and referring families to social service agencies,” said Boston Children’s Eric Fleegler, MD, MPH and creator of HelpSteps.  “I frequently help families download the HelpSteps app while in the Boston Children's emergency department. After 30 seconds of navigating, they often shed tears, tell me ‘this is what we have been looking for,’ and occasionally I receive a hug. That's the greatest gift ever."

help steps logo 2019

HelpSteps partners have collaborated to provide free and easy access to information for the citizens of the Commonwealth on over 11,000 social services related to food insecurity, housing issues, mental health, domestic violence and other human services. This free, multilingual web and mobile app can be used as a screening tool, referral database and constituent services resource. 

“Navigating the complex maze of health and social services can be overwhelming. HelpSteps is a powerful tool that we’re very proud of helping to develop to assist patients, residents, clinicians and public health workers navigate this maze – leveraging technology to provide neighborhood-level resources will have an impact on how people are able to find the help that is right for them,” said Monica Valdes Lupi, Executive Director of the Boston Public Health Commission. 


Thanks to this new partnership, the HelpSteps agency database is now maintained by Boston Public Health Commission and the United Way/Mass2-1-1 and offers 24-hour hotlines for those in need of services. 

“For over 10 years, Mass2-1-1 has been providing critical social service information and resources to residents of the Commonwealth,” said Paul Mina, President and CEO of the United Way of Tri-County/Mass2-1-1. “We are delighted to partner with HelpSteps to strengthen and broaden our reach and as a result will be able to serve even more people, connecting them to essential human services each and every day.”

The website is now live and apps are available at iTunes and the App Store. 

About HelpSteps:

HelpSteps was conceived and developed by Dr. Eric Fleegler, an emergency physician at Boston Children's Hospital. The platform is supported and maintained by Veta Health. For inquiries, please contact info@helpsteps.com or hello@myvetahealth.com

Jan 14
Mayor Walsh, Boston EMS Graduate Academy Class of 19

Mayor Martin J. Walsh together with Boston EMS today celebrated the graduation of 19 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) recruits in a graduation ceremony at Faneuil Hall held before family, friends and colleagues. Among those addressing the graduates were Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) Executive Director Monica Valdes Lupi, JD, MPH, and Boston EMS Chief Jim Hooley. This graduating class will be assigned to 9-1-1 ambulances, strengthening the city's emergency medical services (EMS).

In his FY19 budget, Mayor Walsh prioritized funding for 20 additional EMTs, increasing the number of budgeted full-time EMS providers from 375 to 395 for the City of Boston. The increased number of EMTs will allow for two more frontline ambulances to be staffed, included a second one in East Boston. 

"Becoming an EMT is more than a career -- it's a noble commitment to serve our community, and I want to congratulate all of today's graduates on joining the ranks of a proud and historic first responder family," said Mayor Walsh. "Our EMTs and paramedics are saviors on some of the worst days of people's lives, and also make possible some of our city's best days and most beloved traditions, from First Night to Marathon Monday. I'm incredibly proud to welcome this new class of recruits and thank them for their service to our City."


The graduation ceremony formally acknowledges 19 recruits' successful completion of a rigorous EMT post-hire training program. The recruits, already state-certified EMTs prior to hire, completed an additional 27 weeks of classroom and field training, to better prepare them to work as EMTs in Boston. Recruits (pictured above) were trained in a variety of emergency situations, including life-threatening emergencies, transportation accidents, recovery services, hazardous materials exposure, human trafficking cases and mass casualty incidents. 

"It is with deep admiration and respect that we welcome our new EMT graduates to the EMS community," said Chief of Health and Human Services Marty Martinez. "Each of these new recruits are answering one of the highest calls to public service so anyone in Boston can receive the quality care in their time of most need. I congratulate this new class of recruits and I thank them for their service to the City of Boston."

This recruit class responded to nearly 3,000 9-1-1 calls during their training including emergency incidents related to illnesses, injuries, cardiac incidents, motor vehicle accidents, childbirths, shootings, stabbings, overdoses and more. With guidance from seasoned EMT field training officers, recruits are not only prepared to care for patients, regardless of the circumstance, they also now understand the level of care, clinical excellence and professionalism expected of Boston EMS EMTs. 

"Congratulations to these new recruits for completing this rigorous training and joining our exemplary EMT core. The city faces unique challenges today and we are grateful to have these brave individuals choose to serve our Boston with the highest level of care and professionalism," said Monica Valdes Lupi, Executive Director of BPHC.

As one of the busiest municipal EMS providers in New England, Boston EMS responds to over 125,000 emergency medical incidents per year. As a bureau of the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), Boston EMS is committed to serving Boston's residents through clinical excellence, emergency planning and preparedness, and community outreach.


During the ceremony, after taking the oath, each recruit is "pinned" by a friend or member of their family. 

Chief of Department, Jim Hooley stated, "Boston EMS sees great value in investing in education and professional development for our newly hired EMTs. Completion of academy is only the beginning. As a career EMS clinician, we must continue to learn and evolve along with the field of emergency medical services."

Building on Mayor Walsh's investments in Boston EMS, the FY19 budget includes the replacement of eight ambulances to support EMTs. This commitment by Mayor Walsh will help ensure a high-level of service for all neighborhoods, and aims to have ambulances arrive on scene for Priority 1 calls within six minutes of the initial call. Additionally, the Mayor in FY18 launched the Boston EMS Community Assistance Team that use data to change the way EMTs are deployed to areas including the Boston Common and Recovery Road, improving patient outcomes and ambulance utilization. In its first year alone, the Community Assistance Teams have freed up more ambulances, and resulted in more than 400 referrals to shelters and recovery services.

About the Boston Public Health Commission

The Boston Public Health Commission, one of the country's oldest health department, is an independent public agency providing a wide range of health services and programs. It is governed by a seven-member board of health appointed by the Mayor of Boston.

Public service and access to quality health care are the cornerstones of our mission - to protect, preserve, and promote the health and well-being of all Boston residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable. The Commission's more than 40 programs are grouped into six bureaus: Child, Adolescent & Family Health; Community Health Initiatives; Homeless Services; Infectious Disease; Recovery Services; and Emergency Medical Services.

About Boston Emergency Medical Services

Boston EMS, the provider of emergency medical services for the City of Boston, is committed to compassionately delivering excellent pre-hospital care and to protecting the safety and health of the public.

Boston EMS' vision is to expand upon our role as critical public safety agency that delivers exceptional pre-hospital emergency medicine in an urban environment.

Jan 11
Health Surveillance Data Suggest Increased Flu Activity in Boston
Boston is in the middle of its flu season, which usually runs from October through March. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) data, there is already widespread flu activity in the Commonwealth, most notably increased among young people here in the City of Boston.  

While the widespread designation used by the CDC and DPH signals that cases of the flu have been found in all parts of the State.  Influenza activity in Boston can be different than elsewhere, and the Boston Public Health Commission's (BPHC) Infectious Disease Bureau, monitors flu activity regularly to help the public and health professionals prevent the ongoing spread of flu.   

Information on flu activity reproted to and tracked by BPHC suggests an increase in confirmed flu cases and emergency department visits due to influenza-like illness in Boston this year. DPH data show similar trends occurring overall in the Commonwealth. 

"The flu season is well underway, but it is not too late to get vaccinated.  This year, the flu strain that is causing illness matches with the flu vaccine given in clinics and pharmacies. Those who get the vaccine are less likely to get sick or if they do, only get a mild flu-like illness. The prominent flu strains this year are also more likely to affect young people. An adult can protect the children around them by getting the vaccine for themselves in order to reduce the risk of getting sick then spreading it to others.  If you haven't already got the flu shot, go get it now. That is the best way to protect yourself and those around you from getting the flu," said Jennifer Lo, M.D., medical director at the Boston Public Health Commission.



Everyone in Boston is encouraged to take steps to protect themselves from the flu. This includes: 


  • hand washing regularly throughout the day,  

  • covering your mouth when you cough,  

  • staying home from work when you are sick,  

  • and getting vaccinated.


BPHC's  Infectious Disease Bureau released a public health advisory in November 2018 outlining specific recommendations for the prevention and control of influenza this season, including information on flu vaccine recommendations. Healthcare providers should continue to offer the influenza vaccine to all persons six months of age and older, particularly children.

There have been reported flu cases in all parts of Boston, which is expected for this time of year. Intensity of ILI in the Commonwealth is high.  Throughout the influenza season to date, which appears to be an H1N1-predominant season, an increased proportion of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases have been reported in children under 18 years of age compared to last season.  As reported in previous seasons, flu is disproportionally impacting Black and Latino communities in Boston.

All healthcare providers and laboratories in Boston are required by city health department regulations to report all laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza, regardless of state or city of residence, as well as any clusters of illness, to the Boston Public Health Commission.

The flu shot is the best defense against the flu! 


If you need information about where to get a flu shot or can't afford it, call the Mayor's Health Line at 617-534-5050.
Jan 07
What role does the HPV vaccine play in preventing cervical cancer?

January is National Cervical Cancer Awareness Month! This year we are reminding everyone of the important steps that can be taken in order to prevent and screen for cervical cancer. 

Each year, about 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer and about 4,000 women die from it. One of the main causes of cervical cancer is the human papillomavirus (HPV). 

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, HPV is so common that most sexually-active men and women will get at least one type of HPV at some point in their lives. About 80 million people in the US are currently infected with HPV and about 14 million people in the US become newly infected each year. In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any serious health problems. But when HPV does not go away, it can cause health serious problems, including cervical cancer.

Get Vaccinated!


A vaccine is available to protect men and women from getting the most serious strains of HPV.

FOR WOMEN: The vaccine is recommended for 11 or 12 year-old girls, but can also be given to women through age 26 who did not get any (or all) doses when they were younger.

FOR MEN: The vaccine is recommended for boys aged 11 or 12 years, but can also be given to men through age 21 who did not get any (or all) doses when they were younger. The vaccine is also recommended for men through the age of 26 who have sex with men or have a compromised immune system.

Contact your health care provider to learn more about vaccination options. If you need a health care provider, call the Mayor’s Health Line at 617-534-5050 for help locating one.

Prevent Cervical Cancer with the Right Test at the Right Time!

Screening tests, such as the “Pap test” and HPV test, can find abnormal cells so they can be treated before they turn into cancer. Most health providers perform this test. 
  • The Pap test looks for changes in cells on the cervix that could turn into cancer if left untreated.
  • The HPV test looks for the virus that causes these cell changes.
Most women don’t need a Pap test every year!

The first Pap test is done when a woman turns 21 (even if they completed all necessary doses of the HPV vaccine). 
  • If results are normal, you may not have to repeat the test for three years. Your health care provider will determine how often you need to be tested.
  • If results are abnormal, your health care provider will determine how often you need to be tested.
  • HPV tests aren’t recommended for screening women under 30.
  • When you turn 30, you can:
    • If your test results are normal, get a Pap test every three years OR Get both a Pap test and an HPV test every five years.
    • If either test results are abnormal, your health care provider will determine how often you need to be tested.
  • You can stop getting screened if:
    • You’re older than 65 and have had normal Pap test results for many years.
    • Your cervix was removed during surgery for a non-cancerous condition like fibroids.
When cervical cancer is found early, it is treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.

Help prevent cervical cancer. Vaccinate you and your children against HPV infection, and if you are a woman 21 years old or older, get screened regularly!


Click here to learn more about HPV.



Dec 10
Manny Lopes Appointed Chair of Board of Health

Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced the appointment of Manny Lopes as the Chair of Boston's Board of Health. The Board of Health is the seven-member governing body that oversees the work of the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC). Lopes succeeds Francis Doyle, who stepped down in October from the Board to assume a leadership role within the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

"We are fortunate to have Manny Lopes as the new chair of the Board of Health and look forward to working with him in this new capacity," said Mayor Walsh. "Over the past several years, Manny has built a culture designed to provide the best possible care for patients at the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center. Having served on the Board of Health since 2015, he is already aware of the current and emerging challenges and opportunities facing the Commission's work today and I'm confident that he'll do great job leading the Board."

Lopes currently serves as president and chief executive officer of East Boston Neighborhood Health Center (EBNHC), one of the largest community health centers in the country. Born and raised in East Boston, Manny joined EBNHC as a research assistant at the age of 18, and later held positions at multiple departments within the health center. After a few years outside the health center, during which he worked as a business consultant, Manny rejoined EBNHC in 2004 as vice president and chief information officer. In 2012, Manny was named CEO by the EBNHC Board of Directors and in 2015, became president. He becomes the first person of Cape Verdean descent to be named Chair of the Board of Health in Boston.

"I am ready to serve and drive forward the public health priorities and goals outlined by the Mayor and being executed daily through the vast programming offered by the Commission and its public health and community partners," said Manny Lopes. "I look forward to working closely with Executive Director Valdes Lupi, the BPHC staff, and my fellow board members to further advance an agenda that supports all Bostonians, so they can equally have every opportunity to thrive."

"I am excited to have Manny as Chair and to work closely with him and our Board to implement strategies and initiatives to advance the health for all Bostonians," said Monica Valdes Lupi, Executive Director, Boston Public Health Commission. "Given his leadership at the health center, he has a keen appreciation for the public health challenges that our clients face and brings great energy and experience in innovating to this role."

For more information on the Board of Health, please visit bphc.org/boardofhealth

ABOUT THE BOSTON PUBLIC HEALTH COMMISSION

The Boston Public Health Commission, one of the country's first health departments, is an independent public agency providing a wide range of health services and programs. It is governed by a seven-member board of health appointed by the Mayor of Boston.

Public service and access to quality health care are the cornerstones of our mission - to protect, preserve, and promote the health and well-being of all Boston residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable. The Commission's more than 40 programs are grouped into six bureaus: Child, Adolescent & Family Health; Community Health Initiatives; Homeless Services; Infectious Disease; Recovery Services; and Emergency Medical Services.

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Boston Public Health Commission
1010 Massachusetts Ave, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02118.
Phone:(617) 534-5395 Email: info@bphc.org