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Sep 22
Mayor Walsh Announces Free COVID-19 Testing in Grove Hall

Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh, in partnership with East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, announced that the City of Boston's COVID-19 mobile testing site will now be located in Grove Hall. Testing will be available starting today, Tuesday, September 22 through Saturday, October 3 at 40 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester, across from the Grove Hall Branch of the Boston Public Library. Testing will be available at no cost and for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. No appointment is needed but registration is required. To pre-register, call 617-568-4500 (if you cannot reach this number, please call 617-569-5800 for assistance).

"Our mobile testing team was created to strategically expand testing in neighborhoods most in need because we know this is fundamental for keeping residents safe and healthy," said Mayor Walsh. "Thank you to East Boston Neighborhood Health Center for their continued partnership throughout the pandemic."

The dates and hours of operation in the mobile testing site in Grove Hall are:

Tuesday, September 22- Friday, September 25: 1:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, September 26: 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Tuesday, September 29 - Friday, October 2: 1:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, October 3: 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.


This mobile site testing initiative was announced by Mayor Walsh back in May as a way to help fill any gaps in testing availability, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. The site has previously been located in Roxbury, Allston, South Boston, Mattapan and East Boston. In the East Boston pop up site location, there were 2,519 COVID-19 tests ordered. Of results received, approximately 4.9 percent tested positive for COVID-19.

"We are proud to continue working with the City of Boston to set up pop-up testing sites throughout the city," said East Boston Neighborhood Health Center president and CEO Manny Lopes. "By providing sites that are accessible to residents throughout Boston, we can help identify infection and minimize the spread of COVID-19. East Boston Neighborhood Health Center is proud to play a role in this citywide public health response to the pandemic, especially as we enter the fall season."

In addition to the City's mobile testing sites, COVID-19 testing is available at over 20 locations across the city. Mobile testing sites also continue to be available at select locations, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. Individuals can call the Mayor's Health Line with any questions using 617-534-5050. For a complete list of all testing sites, visit here

The City of Boston has been partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. As of Monday, September 14, 2020, there were 222,242 COVID-19 tests of Boston residents. Out of 222,242 total tests, 7.5% have tested positive, which is down from 7.9% reported through Monday, September 7, 2020. For all Boston residents, the positivity for tests increased slightly from 1.6% for the prior week (September 1-8) to 2.8% for the current week (September 8-14). The latest numbers of cases from the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) by neighborhoods are available here.

Mayor Walsh and the Boston Resiliency Fund Steering Committee have dedicated over $1,794,825 to expand COVID-19 testing and conduct culturally appropriate outreach and education to community health centers across City of Boston neighborhoods, including Bowdoin Street Community Health Center, Codman Square Community Health Center, The Dimock Center, DotHouse Health, Mattapan Community Health Center, Uphams Corner Community Health Center, Whittier Street Community Health Center, Charles River Community Health, Fenway Health, Greater Roslindale Medical & Dental Center, Harbor Health, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center, South Boston Community Health Center, NEW Health Charlestown, South End Community Health Center, and Brookside Community Health Center. The Fund has also supported telehealth services and equipment at those community health centers as well to connect testing to safe treatment options at home.

Resources and information about COVID-19 are available online. Resources available on boston.gov and through City departments include support for renters and homeowners; small businesses; free meals for Boston students; free toiletries for Boston students; support for older residents; information on homeless shelters; resources for those in recovery or those who have a substance use disorder; and mental health resources. More information on Boston's reopening can be found at boston.gov/reopening.

For additional questions or programs, please visit our coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.

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Sep 22
Mayor Walsh, City of Boston Recognize National Recovery Month

Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh is inviting residents to join him for a series of virtual events marking September as Recovery Month, a national observance that aims to combat the social stigma around addiction, celebrate recovery and promote overall awareness.

"This year has been a hard one for everyone, especially for those struggling with substance use or in recovery," said Mayor Walsh. "During this month each year, we celebrate those who've found their path to recovery, remember those we've lost to this disease and provide hope to those still struggling with substance use disorder. With support and treatment, we know people can recover and get their lives back on track."

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Recovery Month events are being held virtually this year. The events are free and open to all to attend, and include:

  • Tuesday, September 22, 2020: 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. Massachusetts Opioid Screening and Awareness Day: virtual town hall event where participants will learn from experts about opioid misuse and treatment, and will be able to take a free, anonymous, online screening for themselves or a loved one. For those who screen positive or have concerns about opioid use, there will be referrals to local treatment resources. Click here to sign up for the free town hall. If you would prefer to dial in to the town hall, click here for the access code.

  • Wednesday, September 23, 2020: 9:30 a.m. - 4 .p.m. MOAR 30th Annual Recovery Day Celebration: hosted by Massachusetts Organization for Addiction Recovery and Friends, Mayor Walsh will provide remarks during the Recovery Day celebration featuring speakers, comedians, and artists. Click here to register. 

  • Tuesday, September 29, 2020: 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Working with CORI and Recovery Virtual Panel: The Mayor's Office of Workforce Development, the Mayor's Office of Public Safety and the Mayor's Office of Recovery Services is hosting a virtual panel to discuss workforce opportunities for residents who are in recovery and impacted by criminal records (CORIs). The panel is part of a series of events facilitated by Project Opportunity, a City of Boston pilot initiative to help residents seal, expunge, and manage their CORIs to gain access to better jobs, housing, and educational opportunities. The panel is free and open to the public, but requires registration. Information on how to register will be made available here before the panel. 

For more events, please visit boston.gov/recovery


The COVID-19 pandemic represented sudden challenges for those suffering from substance use disorder and those who provide treatment and support, such as closure of daytime services, reduced access to treatment and shelters, increased releases from jails and prisons, closure of courts, reduced options for public safety interventions, and closure of public restrooms and access to bathrooms, which led to coordinated efforts from many City departments, to quickly address them. 

"COVID-19 created new challenges as we suddenly faced this global pandemic in the midst of the opioid epidemic. We remain committed to helping people struggling with substance use disorder access the care they need and to find their path to recovery," said Jennifer Tracey, director of the Mayor's Office of Recovery Services.

All City services remained operational during the public health emergency with adaptations made to programming to maintain physical distancing and ensure public safety measures. This includes greatly expanded outdoor space at the Engagement Center (located behind the 112 Southampton Shelter) to maintain guest capacity, the addition of six handwashing stations in Downtown Boston, the shifting of outpatient services to telehealth, and implementation of additional COVID-19 screening, testing, and infection control measures at shelters and residential programs. 

"In Boston, our recovery services team continued their essential work to provide life-saving care to the people of Boston throughout COVID. They remained committed, day and night, to support those who need them the most. We thank them for their compassion and dedication even in these trying times," said Marty Martinez, Boston's Chief of Health and Human Services.

Mayor Walsh, who has been in recovery for more than 20 years, has made expanding access to recovery services in Boston a priority. In his first term, he created the Office of Recovery Services to lead the city's strategy around substance use disorder, addiction and recovery. This is the first municipal recovery office in the nation.

The City has taken a comprehensive approach to tackle the opioid epidemic. The City serves people in all stages of the continuum of care, from youth prevention and support for families, to providing harm reduction services to ensure people can maintain health in various aspects of their lives, to connecting people to treatment, to offering outpatient care and long-term peer support.

The City of Boston is planning an innovative and holistic recovery campus on Long Island that will expand essential recovery services for the region, fill gaps in the continuum of care and utilize the natural environment to provide a healing space. The City has contracted with Gensler and Ascension Recovery Services to identify the types of services, resources and treatment options that would be best suited for the island and create a master plan for the recovery campus. The draft design for the Long Island bridge was completed earlier this year. 

Continuing these efforts, the City of Boston filed a complaint in Suffolk Superior Court against 13 opioid manufacturers, four distributors, and one local doctor that have contributed to the local opioid epidemic through misleading marketing and reckless dissemination of opioids that has led to the deaths of more than 897 Boston residents since 2015. As part of the litigation, the City is seeking to recover both past and future damages and injunctive relief associated with addressing the opioid epidemic in Boston.

For more information on recovery services in Boston, please visit boston.gov/recovery or click here.

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Sep 22
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): The Latest

Visit the BPHC Main Page on COVID-19 

OVERVIEW:

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 or COVID-19 (formerly referred to as 2019 Novel Coronavirus or 2019-nCoV) is a new respiratory virus that was first identified in Wuhan, China in December of 2019. The City of Boston and BPHC have extended the public health emergency declaration until further notice

Boston's Latest Numbers (As of September 22, 2020): (Updated Monday-Friday)

  • 16,703 confirmed cases 

  • 13,467 recovered

  • 761 deaths

Click here for the BPHC 09-17-2020 Weekly COVID-19 Report

Boston Race/Ethnicity Case Data: 

(Updated Monday-Friday)

Race/Ethnicity

Known Cases

Percentage of Known Cases

Asian/PI

566

4%

Black/African-American

4,825

33%

Latinx/Hispanic

4,615

31%

Other

1,000

7%

White

3,766

25%

Total Race/Ethnicity Identified Cases in Boston

14,772

88.4% of total cases in Boston have known Race/Ethnicity data

Total Cases in Boston 

16,703

 


Boston Race/Ethnicity Death Data: 

(Updated Monday-Friday)

Race/Ethnicity

Deaths

Percentage of Known Deaths

Asian/PI

51

7%

Black/African-American

265

35%

Latinx/Hispanic

88

12%

Other

22

3%

White

334

44%

Total Race/Ethnicity Identified Deaths in Boston

760

99.9% of total deaths in Boston have known Race/Ethnicity data

Total Deaths in Boston

761

 


Although complete data on race and ethnicity among COVID-19 positive cases in Boston residents has not been reported to the City of Boston, the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) is actively working to collect available data for public release.

NOTE: Information on race and ethnicity data is collected and reported by multiple entities and may or may not reflect self-reporting by the individual case. A classification of "missing" indicates that no reporter knew the race and ethnicity of the individual, the individual refused to provide the information, or that the originating reporting system does not capture the information. "Other" indicates multiple races or another race that is not listed above.

COVID-19 CORE METRICS

These are the core metrics critical to inform response leadership. BPHC and the City of Boston use this data to monitor the progress of the City's response, to guide decision making and to shape our response moving forward during the COVID-19 pandemic.  All data points cited are 7-day trailing moving averages. 

​Metric (Most recent date)

​Most Recent Date

7 Days Prior​

​Baseline Average

​Threshold

Positive tests (Sept. 14)​

​58.4

43.4​

​21.4

36.2​

Positivity (Sept. 14)​

​2.8%

1.6%​

​2.1%

​4.0%

​COVID-19-like-illness (CLI) ED visits (Sept. 17)

19.1

12.9

​11.6

22.4


Number of deaths at long-term care facilities: 351 (Updated weekly: 09/21/2020)


Neighborhood Testing Data: 

As of September 14, 2020, there were 222,242 COVID-19 tests (with results) of Boston Residents. Of 222,242 totals tests of Boston residents, 7.5% have tested positive. For all Boston residents, the positive for tests increased from 1.6% for the prior week (September 1-September 8) to 2.8% for the current week (September 8 – September 14).

NEIGHBORHOOD

​NUMBER TESTED

OF TESTED, CUMULATIVE % POSITIVE​

CURRENT WEEK % POSITIVE

TESTING RATE PER 100,000 RESIDENTS​

East Boston - 02128

15,775

15.1%

5.1%​

33,616.0

Mattapan - 02126

​ 7,051

​12.7%

2.6%

23,828.2

Hyde Park - 02136​

10,299

12.0%

4.0%

​30,093.8

Dorchester - 02122, 02124

20,527

​11.8%

4.7%​

25,379.6

Dorchester - 02121, 02125

18,880

​11.4%

4.9%

29,372.9

Roslindale - 02131

9,570

9.2%

4.9%

28,337.9

West Roxbury - 02132

7,356

7.2%

3.8%​

25,822.3

Roxbury - 02119, 02120

18,697

6.7%

3.0%

43,311.6

South End - 02111, 02118

15,651

6.6%

1.2%

43,771.7

Jamaica Plain - 02130

​ 15,919

5.4%

2.0%​

39,425.9

Allston/Brighton - 02163, 02134, 02135

22,189

5.1%

4.3%

33,324.3

South Boston - 02127, 02210

 12,343

4.9%​

2.3%

30,785.2

C​harlestown - 02129

5,391

4.5%​

N/A

​27,768.6

Back Bay, Beacon Hill, West End, Downtown, & North End - 02108, 02114, 02116, 02199, 02222, 02109, 02110, 02113​

20,760

3.0%​

0.9%

37,255.7

Fenway - 02115, 02215

21,779

1.9%​

0.5%

39,795.7

Other

​ N/A

N/A​

N/A

​N/A

Boston

222,242

7.5%

2.8%

32,710.9

*N/A = Unable to calculate due to small counts (N<5)


CLICK HERE FOR A MAP OF TESTING SITES IN BOSTON


Visit the City of Boston's Reopening Page
The state has updated guidance on the Reopening Massachusetts website. The City of Boston also continues to update City-specific guidance on the reopening website


If you are concerned that a business located in Boston is not following Massachusetts’ mandatory COVID re-opening protocols, please call or email the Mayor’s Health Line 617-534-5050 / mayorshealthline@bphc.org. All caller information will be kept confidential. If you have a concern regarding a Massachusetts workplace outside the City of Boston, you may contact the board of health for that municipality. For any violation within the Commonwealth, you may also contact the Department of Labor Standards (DLS) through their hotline: (508)-616-0461 ext. 9488, or by sending an email to safepublicworkplacemailbox@mass.gov


ABOUT OUR RESPONSE:

Since January, BPHC and Boston EMS have taken extensive steps to prepare for a potential outbreak of COVID-19.

BPHC is engaging in daily communications with the CDC, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), City of Boston departments and other community partners to make sure we have the latest information on guidance, best practices and recommendations. BPHC will provide updated information on this website and on our social media channels as it becomes available.

We are confident the City of Boston continues to be ready for a safe and effective response as the situation develops.

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT COVID-19?

Visit the BPHC Main COVID-19 Page

Call 311 or 211

Call the Mayor's Healthline: 

617-534-5050 or Toll-Free: 1-800-847-0710

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website on COVID-19

Massachusetts Department of Public Health website on COVID-19


Media Contact: 

Caitlin McLaughlin 

cmclaughlin@bphc.org 

(857-393-0002)

Sep 21
Mayor Walsh, Boston EMS Celebrate New EMT Graduates

Monday, September 21, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today joined Boston EMS to celebrate the graduation of 10 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) recruits in a socially distanced, outdoor ceremony at LoPresti Park in East Boston. This graduating class will be assigned to 911 ambulances, strengthening the City of Boston's Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

"In our lifetime, we've never seen a crisis quite like the COVID-19 pandemic. And through it all, the men and women at Boston EMS have been on the front lines, leading the City's response with incredible courage and passion," said Mayor Walsh. "I'm proud to be here to congratulate the men and women graduating today as they join the best emergency medical services department in the country. "


Today's ceremony formally acknowledges 10 recruits' successful completion of a rigorous post-hire training program for EMTs at Boston EMS. Already state-certified EMTs prior to hire, this graduating class, completed an additional seven months of classroom and field training. Known as "Recruit Class 2020-1," the recruits were trained in a variety of life-threatening emergency situations, including active shooter incidents, hazardous materials exposure, transportation accidents, recovery services, human trafficking and mass casualty incidents. The training program also included a month-long reassignment to assist with the City of Boston's COVID-19 pandemic response, supporting field operations, dispatch operations and enhanced disinfectant procedures.

 "Their rigorous training academy began when the City only had one confirmed case of COVID-19 and it continued through the surge of the pandemic in Boston. This recruit class has seen firsthand the courage, passion and heart it takes to do this job," said Boston EMS Chief James Hooley. "Welcome to Boston EMS. You are serving in historic times and you are ready."

This academy class responded to nearly 1,400 9-1-1 calls during their training. Those emergency incidents included baby deliveries, cardiac arrests, motor vehicle accidents, shootings, stabbings, strokes, overdoses and more. With guidance from seasoned EMT field training officers, recruits are not only prepared to care for patients, regardless of the circumstances, they also now understand the level of care, clinical excellence and professionalism expected of Boston EMS EMTs.

Boston EMS is one of the busiest municipal EMS providers in New England, responding to more than 125,000 emergency medical incidents per year. As a bureau of the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), Boston EMS is committed to serving Boston's residents through clinical excellence, emergency planning and preparedness, and community outreach.


In his FY20 budget, Mayor Walsh added four EMTs to promote diversity and recruitment as well as resources to expand the capacity of Boston EMS's Community Assistance Team, also known as Squad 80. Squad 80 is a two-person team that travels in a non-transport vehicle and answers calls where patients have a low frequency of being transported to the emergency room, making more ambulances available for priority calls that need to get patients to the hospital. It also connects people to our recovery or homeless services and other city programs. In FY21, Mayor Walsh is investing in seven new ambulances, as well as new portable radios to support coordination and communication, new body armor to protect EMTs and Paramedics and new AEDs for patient care.

ABOUT BOSTON EMS

Boston EMS is the primary provider of emergency medical services for the City of Boston and is a nationally recognized leader in the field of pre-hospital emergency medicine. The department leverages the latest advances in both medicine and technology to bring high-quality, compassionate care to the people of Boston. Boston EMS also plays a key role in the City's emergency preparedness efforts and provides community programming designed to educate the public about important health and safety topics.

ABOUT THE BOSTON PUBLIC HEALTH COMMISSION

The Boston Public Health Commission, one of the country's oldest health departments, is an independent public agency providing a wide range of health services and programs. It is governed by a seven-member board of health appointed by the Mayor of Boston. Public service and access to quality health care are the cornerstones of our mission - to protect, preserve and promote the health and well-being of all Boston residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable. The Commission's more than 40 programs are grouped into six bureaus: Emergency Medical Services; Child Adolescent & Family Health; Community Health Initiatives; Homeless Services; Infectious Disease; and Recovery Services.

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Sep 18
Share your Vision for a Racism-Free Boston

RFI Graphic - Slider.pngOn June 12, 2020, Mayor Marty Walsh declared Racism as a Public Health Crisis and pledged funds to the Boston Public Health Commission. In his declaration, Mayor Walsh announced 8-Strategies to combat Racism as it relates to health and health inequities.  

The Boston Public Health Commission is releasing a Request for Information to gain input from residents and community organizations on their experiences of racism in Boston and their vision of a Boston without racism, poverty, and other systems of oppression.  

Community organizations are invited to write a 3-page proposal on their vision of a more equitable Boston as well as share any areas for collaboration with the Boston Public Health Commission. 

The BPHC also invites residents to share their experiences and ideas of where to start this work through an online form where they can answer one or all of the questions that ask about their experiences and ideas for implementing the Mayor’s 8 Strategies. 

The Request for Information and the Online Form is can be found in 8 Languages Below: 


RFI for Community Organizations: 

Online Form for Residents: 

RESPONSES AND PROPOSALS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL OCTOBER 7TH, 2020. 

 

Please email healthequity@bphc.org with any questions.


Sep 03
Mayor Walsh Releases Progress Report on Melnea Cass/Mass Ave. 2.0 Strategic Plan

Thursday, September 3, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today released a progress report on the Melnea Cass/Mass Ave 2.0 Strategic Plan, aimed at addressing the opioid crisis in Newmarket Square and surrounding areas, which has intensified with the COVID-19 pandemic and the high number of individuals seeking health care and shelter. The report marks progress in short-term and long-term strategies that guide the City's work on public health, public safety and quality of life issues that impact individuals who are struggling, and their surrounding communities. 

"This report details the strides we have already made in accomplishing the goals of the Melnea Cass/Mass Ave 2.0 plan, which has required the work of many partners who have dedicated their time, resources and expertise to help us meet our goals," said Mayor Walsh. "This report also discusses the ways in which the COVID-19 public health emergency has exacerbated existing inequities and presented new challenges. As we continue to battle the pandemic, we are providing supportive services for individuals struggling with substance use disorder, while also implementing public health and safety measures to improve quality of life for the entire Boston community."

Responding and recovering from the COVID-19 public health emergency

The COVID-19 pandemic represented sudden challenges, such as closure of daytime services, reduced access to treatment and shelters, increased releases from jails and prisons, closure of courts, reduced options for public safety interventions, and closure of public restrooms and access to bathrooms, which led to coordinated efforts within the Coordinated Response Team, representing many City departments, to quickly address them.

All City services remained operational during the public health emergency with adaptations made to programming to maintain physical distancing and ensure public safety measures. This includes greatly expanded outdoor space at the Engagement Center (located behind the 112 Southampton Shelter) to maintain guest capacity, the addition of six handwashing stations in Downtown Boston, the shifting of outpatient services to telehealth, and implementation of additional COVID-19 screening, testing, and infection control measures at shelters and residential programs. 

Collaboration with the State, Partners Healthcare, Ascension, Boston Health Care for the Homeless, and others led to the creation of 1,000 beds for COVID-19 patients at the Boston Hope Medical Center: 500 for homeless individuals and 500 for hospital overflows. The Boston Medical Center opened the East Newton Pavilion to create an additional 250 beds for COVID-19 patients. The City secured universal testing for shelter guests on two-week intervals, led by Boston Health Care for the Homeless as the clinical partner and in coordination with the Boston Public Health Commission, St. Francis House, and the Pine Street Inn. Guests who test positive for COVID-19 receive the care and support needed to recover and individuals who test negative are placed in designated areas to allow for better physical distancing. 

Through the creation of the Boston Resiliency Fund, Mayor Walsh and the Boston Resiliency Fund Steering Committee raised $33.3 million and awarded nearly $25.9 million to 340 organizations who are working to increase access to medical care, food access, and technology for remote learning. Many of these organizations work in the Mass/Cass area, including Boston Health Care for the Homeless, Pine Street Inn, Boston Medical Center, and the Greater Boston Food Bank. In partnership with the Resiliency Fund and RIZE Massachusetts, critically important funds COVID-19 Rapid Response Grants were awarded to residential substance use treatment providers in Boston. These grants have helped treatment providers continue to provide crucial services to those struggling with substance use disorders. 

The Mass/Cass Task Force continues to plan and reevaluate the services and resources available after COVID-19 in order to ensure ongoing and uninterrupted coordination, and engagement and providing pathways to substance use disorder treatment and housing. 

Coordinating, communicating and aligning services 

Since the launch of the strategic plan, coordination and communication between internal agencies has improved regarding the day-to-day and long-term strategic planning on the Mass/Cass area. The Coordinated Response Team, representing many City departments, was operationalized and has enabled greater consistency in implementing new programming and greater efficiency of resources.  

In addition, a 25-member Task Force composed of community leaders, non-profit partners, institutions, residents, business owners, and elected officials, all of whom are stakeholders in the Melnea Cass Boulevard and Massachusetts Avenue area, was established. The Task Force meets monthly to continue a productive dialogue with diverse stakeholders, increasing the transparency of city-wide efforts towards combating the opioid and homelessness crisis, and offering real-time perspective to policy shapers and service providers alike.

"Since we come from different backgrounds, the members of the Task Force offer unique and different perspectives on the impact of the opioid epidemic and challenges presented by COVID-19," said City Councilor At-Large Annissa Essaibi George. "From building a permanent Engagement Center to increasing the presence of outreach workers, the progress report for the Mass and Cass plan represents feedback from stakeholders directly impacted and involved. With the onset of COVID-19, this work is urgently needed and I look forward to continuing to collaborate with city officials and community members throughout the Task Force."

To help raise public awareness of the collective efforts in the area, the City launched a dedicated website that outlines the City of Boston's strategy to address these issues. The website includes a data dashboard with City metrics within 0.75 miles of the Mass/Cass intersection and a map with all resources in the area. These will be actively maintained with updates, and new and existing data sources will be leveraged to better understand the impact outside the area. 

Connecting those struggling with substance use disorder with resources and recovery 

In an effort to reduce overdose risk and infectious diseases, the City's Post Overdose Response Team (PORT) created programming which automates follow-up engagement with individuals who have recently experienced an overdose. The City employed a rotating Consumer Advisory Board to assist the Mayor's Office of Recovery Services in neighborhood outreach, syringe disposal, and engagement, and expanded the STEP Pilot program, which provides intensive case management, seamless treatment placements, housing supports, and recovery supports to chronically homeless individuals. Through a pilot program to develop individualized housing plans for chronically homeless individuals in Mass/Cass, the City has housed 162 individuals since January. 

Originally opened as a pilot space in August 2017 for individuals in need of a space to spend time during the day and get connected to the many housing and recovery services offered by partners in the Newmarket Square area, the City has been working to construct a permanent Engagement Center which will serve the same number of individuals to get off the street and connect with care. Construction is slated to begin this fall.

Focusing on quality of life issues for residents and businesses

The 2.0 Plan created a dedicated Public Works team to the Melnea Cass and Mass Ave area to provide daily street cleanings every day in the area, in addition to increased additional ground sweeps of Boston Public Health Commission, Parks & Recreation Department and Boston Public Schools properties. The City assigned street sweepers during the spring and summer months; coordinated cleanups with the Mobile Sharps Team, Public Works and the Boston Police Department's Street Outreach Unit, and weekly cleanups at the Reed Street bus stop. The City also expanded collaboration with Project Place to assist with cleaning up debris in the area. 

"One of the unsung but greatly appreciated resources that has made a difference at Mass and Cass is our dedicated Public Works folks," said Stephen Fox from the South End Forum. "For several months, dedicated resources and an aggressive plan to keep up with the volume of street debris, trash, and people on the streets and in our parklands has been a saving grace as we struggle with the crisis of addiction, homelessness, and mental health we see at Mass and Cass. In the city's most challenging environment requiring a multi-disciplinary approach to both the day to day and longer term, Public Works has been there to make a welcome and tangible difference; we both recognize and appreciate their key contributions." 

Boston EMS's Squad 80, which responds to incident call types with low frequency of transport was expanded to seven days a week, freeing up more ambulances and connecting more individuals to city services, including shelters and recovery programs. The Boston Fire Department created a Medical Response Area pilot program, a Delta 21 car staffed with two first responders/recovery coaches that responds to certain incident calls in the Mass Cass area three days a week. 

The number of street outreach workers through the Mayor's Office of Recovery Services was doubled to assist with harm reduction efforts in the neighborhoods and increase engagement. The plan also created a Boston Police Department Street Outreach Unit with the mission to promote community-based outreach to those affected by mental illness, substance use disorder and homelessness to connect individuals to services. 

Ensuring public safety for all residents by reducing criminal activity

In an effort to reduce criminal activity in the Melnea Cass Boulevard and Massachusetts Avenue area, the Boston Police Department and its Street Outreach Unit, and the Mayor's Office of Recovery Services, strategize deployments based upon assessments of hotspots of activity. Police districts D-4 in the South End, C-6 in South Boston, and B-2 in Roxbury created fixed posts as a method of strategic deployment to increase police presence in the area, and deployed the citywide bike unit into the Mass/Cass area. The Mayor's Office of Recovery Services and BPD are working together to increase opportunities for Crisis Intervention and Recovery Coach training for public safety officials. 

The BPD Street Outreach Unit was created, which currently includes five officers and one Sergeant under the direction of a Deputy Superintendent. Their mission is to promote community-based outreach through partnerships and collaboration to those affected by mental illness, substance use disorder and homelessness. They aim to connect these individuals to services before they engage in criminal activity or public disorder.  

The City of Boston will continue to work with community partners and civic associations to sustain initiatives, expand successful programming or services throughout the City, and develop new strategies to combat the impacts of homlessness, substance use disorder and the opioid crisis. Efforts will continue to focus on decentralization of services in the Mass Cass area and the development of new initiatives in other areas of the City to provide comprehensive care and resources to our most vulnerable populations.  

The City continues to make progress on the permitting of the Long Island Bridge in an effort to reestablish vehicular access for the planned Long Island Recovery Campus. By December 2018, the City had submitted applications for every local, state, and federal permit required to rebuild the Long Island Bridge. One of the remaining state permits is the Chapter 91 License from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. With its submission to DEP, the City has concluded the administrative completeness review for the Chapter 91 License and expects to receive that License shortly. Briefs filed in Suffolk Superior Court further ask for a reversal of the Quincy Conservation Commission's denial of a local permit for the Long Island Bridge. On August 27, 2020, the Court held oral arguments on the merits of Boston's challenge. Due to the complex legal and factual questions raised by the litigation, a decision could be expected within 30 days from the date of the hearing. 

For more information on the City's efforts on the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard, please visit boston.gov/mass-cass

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Sep 01
Mayor Walsh Announces Free Mobile Testing Site Now Located in East Boston

Monday, August 31, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced the City of Boston's COVID-19 mobile testing site, in partnership with the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, will now be offering COVID-19 testing in East Boston's Central Square. This COVID-19 testing initiative will be available starting tomorrow, Tuesday, September 1 to Saturday, September 12 on Border Street at Liberty Plaza Shopping Center in East Boston. Testing will be available at no cost for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. No appointment is needed but registration is required. To pre-register, please call 617-568-4500.

"Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been dedicated to monitoring and making decisions based on the latest COVID-19 data. With the increase in cases in East Boston, we are expanding testing access there to ensure that all residents can get tested," said Mayor Walsh. "Thank you to the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center for your continued partnership in helping Bostonians stay safe and healthy."

The dates and hours of operation at Central Square Park in East Boston are: 

Tuesday, September 1st: 2:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, September 2nd: 9:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Thursday, September 3rd - Friday, September 4th: 2:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 

Saturday, September 5th: 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Tuesday, September 8th: 2:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, September 9th: 9:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Thursday, September 10th - Friday, September 11th: 2:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 

Saturday, September 12th: 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

This mobile site testing initiative was announced by Mayor Walsh back in May as a way to help fill any gaps in testing availability, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. The site has previously been located in Roxbury, Allston, South Boston and Mattapan. In Mattapan, there were 927 COVID-19 tests ordered. Of 798 results received, less than 2.2% tested positive for COVID-19.

"East Boston has seen an alarming rise in COVID-19 rates and its critical that we take

immediate actions to stop the spread of the virus," said East Boston Neighborhood Health Center president and CEO Manny Lopes. "Testing is one of the most important infectious disease control tools in our arsenal and we are glad to be partnering with the City of Boston to provide pop-up testing sites throughout the city."

As of August 24th, 2020, East Boston is experiencing a 10.8% average positive test rate for the current week compared to the citywide average positive test rate at 2.3%. Bringing the mobile testing team is one step the City of Boston is taking to address the increase in the positivity rate in the neighborhood. The City is in communication with the State about finding temporary isolation housing so people can quarantine away from their families if they test positive for COVID-19. 

The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) has been mobilizing teams to provide care kits, information, and education to residents and businesses using the languages spoken in the neighborhood, including Spanish. They are distributing information at MBTA stations and key intersections, as well as neighborhood parks where people gather to play sports. Cross-departmental teams in the City of Boston, elected officials who represent the neighborhood, medical and social service providers in the community, union leaders who represent working people in the neighborhood, and Church officials and clergy have helped to get the message out.

In addition to the City's mobile testing sites, COVID-19 testing is available at over 20 locations across the city. Mobile testing sites also continue to be available at select locations, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. Individuals can call the Mayor's Health Line with any questions using 617-534-5050. For a complete list of all testing sites, visit here

The City of Boston has been partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. As of Monday, August 24, 2020, there were 167,859 COVID-19 tests of Boston residents. Out of 167,859 total tests, 9.4% have tested positive, which is down from 10.1% reported through Monday, August 17. For all Boston residents, the positivity for tests decreased slightly from 2.7% for the prior week (August 11-17) to 2.3% for the current week (August 18-24). The latest numbers of cases from the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) by neighborhoods are available here.

Mayor Walsh and the Boston Resiliency Fund Steering Committee have dedicated over $1,720,000 to expand COVID-19 testing and conduct culturally appropriate outreach and education to community health centers across City of Boston neighborhoods, including Bowdoin Street Community Health Center, Codman Square Community Health Center, The Dimock Center, DotHouse Health, Mattapan Community Health Center, Uphams Corner Community Health Center, Whittier Street Community Health Center, Charles River Community Health, Fenway Health, Greater Roslindale Medical & Dental Center, Harbor Health, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center, South Boston Community Health Center, NEW Health Charlestown, South End Community Health Center, and Brookside Community Health Center. The Fund has also supported telehealth services and equipment at those community health centers as well to connect testing to safe treatment options at home.

Resources and information about COVID-19 are available online. Resources available on boston.gov and through City departments include support for renters and homeowners; small businesses; free meals for Boston students; free toiletries for Boston students; support for older residents; information on homeless shelters; resources for those in recovery or those who have a substance use disorder; and mental health resources. More information on Boston's reopening can be found at boston.gov/reopening.

For additional questions or programs, please visit our coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.


Aug 20
Mayor Walsh Announces Free COVID-19 Testing in Mattapan

Wednesday, August 19, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced the City of Boston's COVID-19 mobile testing site, in partnership with the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, will now be offering COVID-19 testing in Mattapan. This COVID-19 testing initiative will be available starting Thursday, August 20 to Saturday, August 29 at Jubilee Christian Church on 1500 Blue Hill Avenue in Mattapan. Testing will be available at no cost for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. No appointment is needed but registration is required. To pre-register, please call (617) 568-4500.

"Our mobile testing teams have played a role in increasing both the capacity and the access to testing in our neighborhoods. We are offering testing to anyone who wants it, at no cost and regardless of symptoms," said Mayor Walsh. "We are going to continue to bring testing wherever is needed, and I encourage everyone to get tested regularly. Knowledge is power in this situation, for individuals and for our community."

The dates and hours of operation at Jubilee Christian Church on 1500 Blue Hill Avenue, in Mattapan are: 

Thursday, August 20 and Friday, August 21: 2:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Saturday, August 22: 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Tuesday, August 25 to Friday, August 28: 2:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Saturday, August 29: 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

This testing initiative was announced by Mayor Walsh back in May as a way to help fill any gaps in testing availability, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. The site has previously been located in Roxbury, Allston and South Boston. In South Boston, there were 3,067 COVID-19 tests conducted. Of 2,838 results received, less than 1% tested positive for COVID-19. 

"We are glad to be partnering with the City of Boston to provide pop-up testing sites throughout the city," said East Boston Neighborhood Health Center president and CEO Manny Lopes. "Testing is one of the ways that we can mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and by offering accessible testing at sites in Boston, we are able to minimize the spread especially among our most vulnerable populations. For 50 years, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center has served residents of Boston regardless of status and we will continue to do so, even in the face of new challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic."

In addition to the City's mobile testing sites, COVID-19 testing is available at over 20 locations across the city. Mobile testing sites also continue to be available at select locations, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. Individuals can call the Mayor's Health Line with any questions using 617-534-5050. For a complete list of all testing sites, visit here

The City of Boston has been partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. As of Monday, August 10, 2020, there were 139,119 COVID-19 tests of Boston residents. Out of 139,119 total tests, 10.9% have tested positive, which is down from 11.6% reported through Monday, August 3. For all Boston residents, the positivity for tests decreased slightly from 2.8% for the prior week (July 28 to August 3) to 2.6% for the current week (August 4-10). The latest numbers of cases by Boston neighborhoods are available here.

Mayor Walsh and the Boston Resiliency Fund Steering Committee have dedicated over $1,720,000 to expand COVID-19 testing and conduct culturally appropriate outreach and education to community health centers across City of Boston neighborhoods, including Bowdoin Street Community Health Center, Codman Square Community Health Center, The Dimock Center, DotHouse Health, Mattapan Community Health Center, Uphams Corner Community Health Center, Whittier Street Community Health Center, Charles River Community Health, Fenway Health, Greater Roslindale Medical & Dental Center, Harbor Health, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center, South Boston Community Health Center, NEW Health Charlestown, South End Community Health Center, and Brookside Community Health Center. The Fund has also supported telehealth services and equipment at those community health centers as well to connect testing to safe treatment options at home.

Resources and information about COVID-19 are available online. Resources available on boston.gov and through City departments include support for renters and homeowners; small businesses; free meals for Boston students; free toiletries for Boston students; support for older residents; information on homeless shelters; resources for those in recovery or those who have a substance use disorder; and mental health resources. More information on Boston's reopening can be found at boston.gov/reopening.

For additional questions or programs, please visit our coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.

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Aug 10
Mayor Walsh Urges Caution During Hot Temperatures

Sunday, August 9, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh is reminding residents to take precautions to stay cool during the hot and humid weather that is forecasted for today through Wednesday, August 12, 2020. For the next three days, the temperature will reach the high 80s and low 90s, with the heat index, or "real feel" temperature, reaching up to 96 degrees. 

"As we continue to take COVID-19 precautions, please take steps to keep yourself safe in the hot weather," said Mayor Walsh. "Whenever you're out, please wear a face covering, stay six feet away from others, avoid crowds and wash your hands often. If you begin to feel overheated, find a shaded place that's six feet away from others and remove your face covering."

Mayor Walsh has not declared a Heat Emergency. The City's two outdoor pools, the  BCYF Clougherty Pool  in Charlestown and the BCYF Mirabella Pool  in the North End, are now open seven days a week through Labor Day from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there are several new protocols in place at the outdoor pools. Capacity has been reduced to less than 40 percent capacity or 75 people per session and you must register for a swim time slot ahead of time as walk-ins will not be allowed. Registration opens 24 hours before the following day's sessions at Boston.gov/BCYF-Summer

Tot sprays are open at playgrounds in the City, with restrictions. Boston Public Libraries and indoor City-operated pools remain closed to the public at this time due to COVID-19 safety measures. 

Information on heat safety tips can be found online at boston.gov/heat and by following @CityofBoston on Twitter. Residents can sign up for Alert Boston, the City's emergency notification system, to receive emergency alerts by phone, email or text. Residents are also encouraged to call 311 with any questions about available city services.

The Mayor issued the following heat safety tips for all members of the public:

  • Children and pets should never be left alone in vehicles, even for short periods of time.

  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of fluids regardless of activity level. Avoid alcoholic beverages and liquids high in sugar or caffeine.

  • Adults and children should use sunscreen containing an SPF-30 or higher and wear protective, loose-fitting clothing, including long sleeve shirts and hats.

  • Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours. Rest often in shady areas and be extra cautious from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., when the sun's UV radiation is strongest.

  • Know the signs of heat exhaustion. Heavy sweating, cool and clammy skin, dizziness, nausea, and muscle aches could all be signs of heat exhaustion. If symptoms persist, call 911 immediately. Do not delay care. Heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the US and can exacerbate underlying illnesses.

  • Keep cool with showers, shade, and air conditioning or fans. The City's two outdoor poolsUrban wilds and tot sprays at playgrounds are open in Boston. When visiting, residents should wear face coverings (unless in the spray), maintain 6 feet of distance, and wash hands before and after visiting.If it is cooler outside than at home, wear a face covering and find a shady spot outside. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering. If no AC is available:

    • Take frequent cool showers

    • Help find a non-sick family member or neighbor with AC to visit. Wear a face covering and stay 6 feet apart.

  • If you have a child in your home, use child window guards in addition to screens on any open window on the second story or above. Falls are the leading cause of injury for children under the age of six. 

  • Secure all window air conditioner units according to the manufacturer's specifications.

  • Please call or virtually check on neighbors, especially older adults, and people with disabilities.

Helping the Homeless:

  • If you see homeless individuals out in the heat who appear immobile or disoriented, please call 911. Please ask them if they need assistance.

  • The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) operates emergency shelters at 112 Southampton St. and 794 Massachusetts Ave. These facilities are air conditioned and open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

  • The City of Boston works closely with a network of shelter providers to ensure there is adequate shelter, food, water, and a cool respite from the heat.

  • Street outreach teams providing recovery services, including the Engagement Center behind 112 Southampton St., remain operating as normal during summertime weather. 

  • All sites (Shelters, the Engagement Center, comfort stations) are following COVID-19 guidelines by promoting handwashing, hand sanitizer, and face coverings. Guests are provided sunscreen and water. Nursing teams are onsite to support. 

Playground Safety:  

  • Children should always wear shoes on playgrounds because surfaces can become extremely hot and cause burns, even splash pads and spray decks.

  • Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, children should wear a face covering (except while in the water), stay 6 feet away from others, and wash/sanitize hands before and after play.

Beach Safety:

  • Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), if going to a beach or a large body of water, it is important to wear a face covering unless in the water, stay 6 feet apart from others, and avoid crowds due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. 

  • Don't wear face coverings in the water because they can be difficult to breathe through when they're wet. This means it is particularly important to maintain social distancing in the water. If the face covering results in overheating or trouble breathing, find a shaded area where 6 feet of distance from others can safely be maintained and remove the face covering.

Outdoor Fires and Grilling:

  • No outdoor fires are allowed in Boston, including fire pits, chimineas, and bonfires.

  • Charcoal grills must be on the ground and away from buildings. Keep in mind the wind and never leave unattended. When done, dispose of the ash in a metal container once completely out.

  • Propane tank grills are only allowed on first floor porches with steps to the ground. Do not place propane tank grills near air conditioners or up against a building. Make sure all connections are tight and never carry propane tanks into a home.

  • Grills should always be used in a well-ventilated area

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Aug 03
Mayor Walsh Announces Free Pop-Up COVID-19 Testing in South Boston

​Monday, August 3, 2020 - Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced that the City of Boston's pop-up COVID-19 testing site, in partnership with the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, will now be offering COVID-19 testing in South Boston. This COVID-19 testing initiative will be available starting tomorrow, Tuesday, August 4 to Saturday, August 15 at Moakley Park on Old Colony Avenue near 1187 Columbia Road in South Boston. Testing will be available at no cost for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals by walk-up only. No appointment needed but registration is required for individuals to receive test results. For a quicker testing experience, residents are encouraged to pre-register at (617) 568-4500.

"Testing is one of the best tools we have to stop the spread and reopen safely, and we're going to keep making sure it's widely available here in Boston," said Mayor Walsh. "If you think you might be sick, or if you've been in a group without distancing or masks, get tested. Thank you to the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center for your partnership in making COVID-19 testing more accessible for more residents."

The dates and hours of operation at Moakley Park on Old Colony Avenue near 1187 Columbia Road in South Boston are: 

  • Tuesday, August 4th to Friday, August 7th: 2:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m. 

  • Saturday, August 8th: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 

  • Tuesday, August 11th to Friday, August 14th: 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

  • Saturday, August 15th: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 

The pop-up testing initiative was announced by Mayor Walsh back in May as a way to help fill any gaps in testing availability, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. The site was located at the Washington Park Mall in Roxbury in June and most recently at the BCYF Jackson Mann Community Center in Allston. In Allston, over the course of 10 days, there were 3,205 COVID-19 tests conducted. Of 2,504 results received so far, approximately 1% tested positive for COVID-19. 

"We are glad to be partnering with the City of Boston to provide pop-up testing sites throughout the city," said East Boston Neighborhood Health Center president and CEO Manny Lopes. "Testing is one of the ways that we can mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and by offering accessible testing at sites in Boston, we are able to minimize the spread especially among our most vulnerable populations. For 50 years, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center has served residents of Boston regardless of status and we will continue to do so, even in the face of new challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic."

In addition to the City's pop-up and mobile testing sites, COVID-19 testing is available at over 20 locations across the city. Mobile testing sites also continue to be available at select locations, prioritizing neighborhoods and populations that need dedicated testing efforts to create equitable access to testing. Individuals can call the Mayor's Health Line with any questions using 617-534-5050. For a complete list of all testing sites, visit here

The City of Boston has been partnering with community health centers to increase access to testing, particularly in neighborhoods experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. As of July 27, 2020, there were 115,712 COVID-19 tests of Boston residents. Of 115,712 total tests of Boston residents, 12.5 percent have tested positive, which is down from 13.3 percent reported through July 20. The latest numbers of cases by Boston neighborhoods are available here.

Mayor Walsh and the Boston Resiliency Fund Steering Committee have dedicated over $1,720,000 to expand COVID-19 testing and conduct culturally appropriate outreach and education to community health centers across City of Boston neighborhoods, including Bowdoin Street Community Health Center, Codman Square Community Health Center, The Dimock Center, DotHouse Health, Mattapan Community Health Center, Uphams Corner Community Health Center, Whittier Street Community Health Center, Charles River Community Health, Fenway Health, Greater Roslindale Medical & Dental Center, Harbor Health, East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Southern Jamaica Plain Health Center, South Boston Community Health Center, NEW Health Charlestown, South End Community Health Center, and Brookside Community Health Center. The Fund has also supported telehealth services and equipment at those community health centers as well to connect testing to safe treatment options at home.

Resources and information about COVID-19 are available online. Resources available on boston.gov and through City departments include support for renters and homeowners; small businesses; free meals for Boston students; free toiletries for Boston students; support for older residents; information on homeless shelters; resources for those in recovery or those who have a substance use disorder; and mental health resources. More information on Boston's reopening can be found at boston.gov/reopening.

For additional questions or programs, please visit our coronavirus website or call 3-1-1, Boston's 24-hour constituent hotline. Text BOSCOVID to 888-777 to receive text alerts on a regular basis, available in 11 languages.


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Boston Public Health Commission
1010 Massachusetts Ave, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02118.
Phone:(617) 534-5395 Email: info@bphc.org